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Richard Feynman

Biography

American theoretical physicist who done electrodynamics and contributed to the introduction of the atomic bomb as part of the Manhattan Project. He received the Nobel Reward in Physics in 1965 for his function in developing quantum electrodynamics. He began talking relatively past due, after age group 3, a characteristic he had in keeping with other prominent physicists. While operating in the leading edge of technology, he maintained a typical contact with books popularizing and detailing physics. His dad motivated both him and his sister, who also became a physicist, to problem conventional knowledge. He analyzed physics in Princeton, alongside another great physicist of this, Albert Einstein.

Quick Facts


Full Name Richard Feynman
Date Of Birth May 11, 1918
Died February 15, 1988, Los Angeles, California, United States
Place Of Birth New York City, NY
Profession Scientist
Education Princeton University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Far Rockaway High School
Nationality American
Spouse Gweneth Howarth, Mary Louise Bell, Arline Greenbaum
Children Carl Feynman, Michelle Louise Feynman
Parents Melville Feynman, Lucille Phillips
Siblings Joan Feynman, Henry Philips
Awards Nobel Prize in Physics, Oersted Medal, Albert Einstein Award, National Medal of Science for Physical Science, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award, Foreign Member of the Royal Society
Movies Genghis Blues, Infinity, Anti-Clock
Star Sign Taurus

  • Facts
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#Fact
1Biography in: "The Scribner Encyclopedia of American Lives". Volume Two, 1986-1990, pages 289-291. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1999.
2His last name is actually pronounced "Fine-man" although many Europeans (and those influenced by European customs) still pronounce it "Fane-man".
3Has two children: Carl (1962-present) and Michelle Feynman (1968-present)
4Signed all of his sketches and drawings under the pen name "Ofey" so no one would figure out it was him who was drawing them.
5According to "Surely you're joking Mr. Feynman" written by Feynman himself, he started drumming during his time at Los Alamos as he was enchanted by the drumming of the Indians and because there was no entertainment there. He tried to give it up after he became a Professor (which coincided with his 10 month stay in Brazil) Later on he began to play again and taught himself African drumming after a friend gave him some sheet music based on the drumming of the Watusi tribe.
6Pictured on one of four 37¢ USA commemorative postage stamps honoring American Scientists, issued 4 May 2005. Others honored in this issue were geneticist Barbara McClintock, mathematician John von Neumann, and physicist/thermodynamicist Josiah Willard Gibbs.
7Sat on the Challenger US space shuttle disaster commision. He was the one who reported the o-ring as being the cause of the explosion.
8Won Nobel Prize in physics (1965). He was considering turning it down.


Writer

Writer

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Infinity1996books "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!" and "What Do You Care What Other People Think?'"
The Character of Physical Law1964TV Mini-Series documentary

Actor

Actor

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Anti-Clock1979The Physicist

Soundtrack

Soundtrack

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Coil2001writer: "Kargyraa Rap"

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

TitleYearStatusCharacter
About Time1962TV Movie advisor

Self

Self

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Horizon1964-1988TV Series documentaryHimself
Nova1983TV Series documentaryHimself
Fun to Imagine1983TV Series documentaryHimself
The Character of Physical Law1964TV Mini-Series documentaryHimself

Archive Footage

Archive Footage

TitleYearStatusCharacter
CERN: Warum wir das tun was wir tun2015Video documentaryHimself (uncredited)
Is the Man Who Is Tall Happy?2013DocumentaryHimself (uncredited)
The Reality of Me (TROM)2011DocumentaryHimself
The End of God? A Horizon Guide to Science and Religion2010TV Movie documentaryHimself
CERN neboli Továrna na absolutno2010DocumentaryHimself
Nova2008TV Series documentaryHimself, Physicist
Battle for the Beginning2008TV Movie documentaryHimself
Challenger: The Untold Story2006TV Movie documentaryHimself
Dan Aykroyd Unplugged on UFOs2005DocumentaryHimself - Nobel Prize Winner
Genghis Blues1999DocumentaryHimself

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#Quote
1The theoretical broadening which comes from having many humanities subjects on the campus is offset by the general dopiness of the people who study these things.
2People who wish to analyze nature without using mathematics must settle for a reduced understanding.
3I believe that a scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy.
4You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts. I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.
5We are at the very beginning of time for the human race. It is not unreasonable that we grapple with problems. But there are tens of thousands of years in the future. Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on.
6The first principle is that you must not fool yourself - and you are the easiest person to fool.
7Philosophers say a great deal about what is absolutely necessary for science, and it is always, so far as one can see, rather naive, and probably wrong.
8I was born not knowing and have had only a little time to change that here and there.
9If I could explain it to the average person, I wouldn't have been worth the Nobel Prize. "Reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled. [on identifying the reason for the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger by showing that O-rings grow brittle when immersed in water, Life magazine, January 1987]
10The stars are made of the same atoms as the earth. I usually pick one small topic like this to give a lecture on. Poets say science takes away from the beauty of the stars - mere gobs of gas atoms. Nothing is "mere." I too can see the stars on a desert night, and feel them. But do I see less or more? The vastness of the heavens stretches my imagination - stuck on this carousel my little eye can catch one-million-year-old light. A vast pattern - of which I am a part - perhaps my stuff was belched from some forgotten star, as one is belching there. Or see them with the greater eye of Palomar, rushing all apart from some common starting point when they were perhaps all together. What is the pattern, or the meaning, or the "why?" It does not do harm to the mystery to know a little about it. For far more marvelous is the truth than any artists of the past imagined! Why do the poets of the present not speak of it? What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?
11For those who want some proof that physicists are human, the proof is in the idiocy of all the different units which they use for measuring energy.
12I'd hate to die twice. It's so boring. [last words]
13For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled. [After working on the Challenger investigation]


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