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Matt Reeves

Biography

Screenwriter and movie director who is most widely known for his blockbuster strike Cloverfield. He was also among the authors and designers of the tv screen crisis Felicity. He began making movies when he was just eight yrs . old and got short films shown on Public-access tv. While at USC, he created the pupil film, Mr. Petrified Forest, which would afterwards help him secure Hollywood representation. He grew up in Rockville Center, NY. Professional Chris Mulkey made an appearance in his strike film Cloverfield, a spooky end-of-the-world story.

Quick Facts


Full Name Matt Reeves
Date Of Birth April 27, 1966
Place Of Birth Long Island, NY
Profession Screenwriter
Education University of Southern California
Nationality American
Spouse Melinda Wang
Nominations Empire Award for Best Director, Gotham Independent Film Award for Best Feature Film
Movies War for the Planet of the Apes, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Let Me In, Cloverfield, The Yards, The Pallbearer, Under Siege 2: Dark Territory, Future Shock, Planet of the Apes Triple Feature
TV Shows Felicity
Star Sign Taurus

  • Facts
  • Filmography
  • Awards
  • Salaries
  • Quotes
  • Trademarks
  • Pictures

#Fact
1He and J.J. Abrams first met screening their early shorts at an 8mm film fest in Los Angeles.


Writer

Writer

TitleYearStatusCharacter
War for the Planet of the Apes2017post-production
Let Me In2010/Iscreenplay
Felicity1998-2002TV Series created by - 84 episodes
The Yards2000written by
The Pallbearer1996written by
Under Siege 2: Dark Territory1995written by
Future Shock1994segment "Mr. Petrified Forrest"

Producer

Producer

TitleYearStatusCharacter
10 Cloverfield Lane2016executive producer
Felicity1998-2002TV Series executive producer - 61 episodes
The Yards2000co-producer

Director

Director

TitleYearStatusCharacter
War for the Planet of the Apes2017post-production
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes2014
Let Me In2010/I
Cloverfield2008
Conviction2006TV Series 1 episode
Miracles2003TV Series 1 episode
Felicity1998-2001TV Series 5 episodes
Gideon's Crossing2000TV Series 1 episode
Homicide: Life on the Street1997TV Series 1 episode
Relativity1997TV Series 1 episode
The Pallbearer1996
Future Shock1994segment "Mr. Petrified Forrest"

Actor

Actor

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Cloverfield2008Radio Announcer (voice, uncredited)

Thanks

Thanks

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Gen RX2014Short special thanks
Chernobyl Diaries2012special thanks
Area 51 Confidential2011acknowledgment
Super 82011thanks
Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen2009special thanks

Self

Self

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: Andy Serkis: Rediscovering Caesar2014Video shortHimself
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: Humans and Apes: The Cast of 'Dawn'2014Video shortHimself
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: Journey to Dawn2014Video shortHimself
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: Move Like an Ape: An Artist2014Video shortHimself
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: The Ape Community2014Video shortHimself
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: The Fight for a New Dawn2014Video shortHimself
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: The World of 'Dawn'2014Video shortHimself
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: Weta and Dawn2014Video shortHimself
Janela Indiscreta2014TV SeriesHimself
Días de cine2014TV SeriesHimself
Just Seen It2014TV SeriesHimself
Cinema 32010TV SeriesHimself
'Cloverfield' Visual Effects2008Video documentary shortHimself
Rencontres de cinéma2008TV SeriesHimself
Entertainment Tonight2008TV SeriesHimself

Won awards

Won awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
2010Fright Meter AwardFright Meter AwardsBest ScreenplayLet Me In (2010)· John Ajvide Lindqvist
2008Filmmaker's Showcase AwardAcademy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USA

Nominated awards

Nominated awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
2015Saturn AwardAcademy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USABest DirectorDawn of the Planet of the Apes (2014)
2015Empire AwardEmpire Awards, UKBest DirectorDawn of the Planet of the Apes (2014)
2011Saturn AwardAcademy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USABest DirectorLet Me In (2010)
2011Saturn AwardAcademy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USABest WritingLet Me In (2010)
2010Fright Meter AwardFright Meter AwardsBest DirectorLet Me In (2010)
2010Gotham Independent Film AwardGotham AwardsBest FeatureLet Me In (2010)· Simon Oakes
· Alexander Yves Brunner
· Guy East
· Tobin Armbrust
· Donna Gigliotti
· John Nordling
· Carl Molinder


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#Quote
1Really interesting genre films, especially monster movies, evoke the fears of the times intentionally.
2I wanted to explore the possibility that this could have become 'Planet of the Humans and the Apes' instead of just 'Planet of the Apes,' so I wanted there to be this hope of connection as well as this inexorable pull towards what we know the series becomes.
3'Avatar' was incredible and totally groundbreaking, but it wasn't about utter realism. It had a great mythic fantasy to it, but the characters don't seem totally photo-real, as amazing as they are.
4I thought this was the most incredible opportunity. Because 'Planet Of The Apes,' aside from the fantasy element of talking apes, is such an amazing franchise, because under the surface of that genre, you're actually looking at human nature.
5I remember watching the Blu-ray, and also when they first released it on DVD in the collection of all three movies of 'The Godfather,' and seeing all of those scenes that they cut out, and there wasn't a single one of them that I wished they had kept it, but they were the most exciting thing to watch anyway.
6I'm always looking for a reason to say no when I'm approached about a big studio tentpole because your fear is will you be consumed into the anonymous machine, and it will suck out any specificity and point of view that you might hope to express.
7It's crazy when you think about the 'Apes' franchise and how dark all of the endings are and how dark the movies are, and yet there's something very pleasurable about these movies. It really comes down to the potency of this idea, of seeing intelligent apes.
8I'm a first-time father, and it was amazing to me to learn that my son could actually use sign language before the spoken word. I could see this intelligence in his eyes before he could speak: how he could understand what was going on around him and was frustrated by that.
9I was obsessed with movies, and it ended up being the tool with which I could make friends. Because I was too painfully shy in other circumstances, I would say, 'Hey, do you want to make a movie?' And that's how I made friends, and it was also my escape.
10In a weird way, if you look at all the 'Apes' movies, they all seem like different stories in the same universe. 'Beneath the Planet of the Apes' is definitely a continuation, but the other ones jump all around chronologically.
11When we were all kids, there was one particular trailer that I think we can all remember. That was the trailer for 'Close Encounters of the Third Kind.' There was an amazing teaser trailer with all this weird kind of documentary footage. We were like, 'What was that! I've got to see that! What the hell was that?'
12It's funny, people don't think of 'Cloverfield' as being restrained because it's a handycam movie, but the only reason it's a handycam movie is because that was supposed to be the reality of the situation.
13There's something about seeing a movie that you like, and being able to see the scenes that didn't make it, just as a window into the process of how choices are made and how a movie is made. To me, the idea of getting to have the scenes on the DVD is very exciting.
14There's tremendous shame with being bullied. I think there's a level at which you think that there's a reason that you're being singled out, that you're being chosen.
15When you think of the 'Exorcist,' you think of Linda Blair and pea soup and all this madness, but really if you look at the first half of that film, the stuff between her and Ellen Burstyn is so naturalistic and so real.
16People's imagination is the most effective tool in creating terror or dread.
17I discovered the fun of genre is... you get to explore your fears, and you get to use the metaphor of the genre - whether it's a giant monster or a... 12-year-old vampire. Whatever it is, you can sink something underneath the surface and make a personal film under the guise of great fun romp.
18I never would have guessed I would be making science fiction and horror films.
19As a kid, I was always mistaken for a girl. Before you reach that age where your sexuality starts to display itself, kids can look very androgynous, and I guess I leaned more toward the feminine. All those things were very hard, growing up, because you're trying to create an identity, and you're feeling shameful about the one that you're making.
20Really interesting genre films, especially monster movies, evoke the fears of the times intentionally. Our starting point was Godzilla - the original movie was released less than 10 years after Hiroshima, and it's a classic in Japan. It came out at the same time as Seven Samurai and is held in equal regard. Yet it was definitely a metaphor for the anxiety of those times, about the fears after Hiroshima and the knowledge that we now had the ability to destroy the world. To give that the form of a giant monster - that was an effective way of exploring that fear.
21It's the idea that anticipation is as scary as anything in a movie could be. People's imagination is the most effective tool in creating terror or dread.


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