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Gregory Peck

Biography

He played Atticus Finch directly into Destroy a Mockingbird, a job that earned him the Academy Honor for Best Acting professional. Among the best actors from the ’40s and ’50s, he starred in The Secrets from the Kingdom and Gentleman’s Contract. While attending university, he was used as a pickup truck drivers for an essential oil company. Pursuing his graduation from Berkeley with an British degree, he relocated to NY and analyzed under Sanford Meisner. He was nominated for an Academy Honor four occasions in the 1st five many years of his film performing profession. His grandson may be the aspiring acting professional Ethan Peck. He was wedded to Greta Kukkonen from 1942 to 1955. One of is own five children is usually Cecilia Peck. In 1969, he was granted the Presidential Medal of Independence by Lyndon B. Johnson.

Quick Facts


Full Name Gregory Peck
Date Of Birth April 5, 1916
Died June 12, 2003, Los Angeles, California, United States
Place Of Birth San Diego, CA
Height 1.9 m
Profession Movie Actor
Education University of California, Berkeley, Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre, San Diego High School, St. John's Military Academy, San Diego State University
Nationality American
Spouse Veronique Passani, Greta Kukkonen
Children Cecilia Peck, Stephen Peck, Anthony Peck, Jonathan Peck, Carey Paul Peck
Parents Bernice Mae Ayres, Gregory Pearl Peck
Awards Academy Award for Best Actor, Presidential Medal of Freedom, Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture – Drama, AFI Life Achievement Award, Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award, Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, Kennedy Center Honors, Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, Golden Globe Henrietta Award for World Film Favorites, Honorary César, David di Donatello for Best Foreign Actor, Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Miniseries, or Motion Picture Made for Television, List of recipients of the National Medal of Arts, David di Donatello Special Award, American Society of Cinematographers Board of the Governors Award, German Film Award for Lifetime Achievement
Nominations BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actor, Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or a Movie
Movies Roman Holiday, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Big Country, The Gunfighter, The Guns of Navarone, Duel in the Sun, Twelve O'Clock High, Spellbound, The Omen, Gentleman's Agreement, The Yearling, The Boys from Brazil, Yellow Sky, The Keys of the Kingdom, Captain Horatio Hornblower, The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, Cape Fear, How the West Was Won, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, The Bravados, Designing Woman, Moby Dick, The Stalking Moon, The Paradine Case, Shoot Out, On the Beach, Only the Valiant, The Sea Wolves, Mackenna's Gold, Other People's Money, Captain Newman, M.D., David and Bathsheba, Pork Chop Hill, The Purple Plain, Beloved Infidel, Days of Glory, I Walk the Line, The Valley of Decision, Old Gringo, Mirage, The Great Sinner, Billy Two Hats, The World in His Arms, The Scarlet and the Black, Marooned, Night People, Man with a Million, Behold a Pale Horse, Amazing Grace and Chuck, The Macomber Affair, Arabesque
TV Shows The Blue and the Gray, The Dick Powell Show, Moby Dick
Star Sign Aries

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#Fact
1 The friendship Peck hit off with director William Wyler on Roman Holiday (1953) almost ended during the stressful shoot of The Big Country (1958) where the two men clashed so often that by the end they were not on speaking terms with each other. They mended their friendship a year later after Wyler won the Oscar for Ben-Hur (1959) but they never worked together again.
2 Along with Peter Ustinov, Peck delivered the eulogy for friend and two-time co-star David Niven.
3 He shared an April 5 birthday with double Oscar winners Melvyn Douglas, Spencer Tracy, and Bette Davis.
4 Injured his spine in a physical training class resulting in his having to wear a back brace for six years and a World War II exemption. "I can ride horses, but I can't pick up a suitcase.".
5 His favourite director was Henry King and his favourite co-star was Ava Gardner.
6 The two people he regretted most not working with are John Ford and Greta Garbo.
7 Peck's father encouraged him to take up medicine but his grades weren't good enough for Berlely. He later took a public speaking course at San Diego State which was his introduction to acting.
8 Peck's first effort as producer, "Thieves' Market," in which he planned to star with Ava Gardner, was abandoned because "we were unable to develop the script properly.".
9 Peck spent time early in his career working at the Barter Theatre in Abingdon, VA - the State Theatre of Virginia. A picture hangs in the theatre of him with an old pickup truck, showing how he worked both behind the scenes as well as on stage. The Barter also boasts stints from Ernest Borgnine, Patricia Neal, Larry Linville, and Kevin Spacey.
10 John Wayne reportedly turned down two of Peck's most iconic roles: The Gunfighter (1950) and Twelve O'Clock High (1949).
11 Strongly disliked his first name of Eldred, a name his mother insisted on giving him because she felt it was distinct and would distinguish him with its uniqueness, but to him it felt like an awkward and difficult name to use casually. Early in adulthood he made it a point of using his middle name of Gregory, which he used for the rest of his life.
12 Was awarded the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1967.
13 Owned a race horse called Owen Sedge which he saw come 7th in the 1963 Grand National. He then flew back to the States to attended the Oscar ceremony and won Best Actor Award for To Kill a Mockingbird (1962).
14 Became friends with Audrey Hepburn after working with her in Roman Holiday (1953). Peck successfully persuaded Paramount executives to give her top billing rather than "Introducing" credit, because he strongly believed the film would make her a star. Indeed, Hepburn would win the Academy Award for Best Actress at the 1954 Oscars and they both remained close until her death in 1993. That same year, Peck presented her son Sean H. Ferrer with the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in recognition for her work with UNICEF.
15 Travelling in Alabama making campaign appearances for Democratic U.S. Senate Candidate Donald W. Stewart, who was running in a special election to complete the term of U.S. Senator James B. Allen, who had died in office. Stewart won the seat. [October 1978]
16 Mark Waid and Alex Ross based the design of the older Bruce Wayne/Batman on Peck for Their seminal 1996 graphic novel ''Kingdom Come''. Frank Miller also based the design of young Bruce in his iconic story ''Batman: Year One''.
17 Orson Welles had once hoped to make a film of the DC Comics hero Batman with Peck in the lead role but the project never came to fruition. This was revealed to have been a hoax.
18 Is one of 8 actors who have received an Oscar nomination for their performance as a priest. The others, in chronological order, are: Spencer Tracy for San Francisco (1936) and Boys Town (1938); Charles Bickford for The Song of Bernadette (1943); Bing Crosby for Going My Way (1944) and The Bells of St. Mary's (1945); Barry Fitzgerald for Going My Way (1944); Karl Malden for On the Waterfront (1954); Jason Miller for The Exorcist (1973); and Philip Seymour Hoffman for Doubt (2008). Tracy, Crosby and Fitzgerald all won Oscars for their performances.
19 The name "Gregory Peck" is used as the Cockney Rhyming Slang for neck (as used traditionally by the inhabitants of East London), so the expression "Get it down your Gregory" means "Drink this!".
20 Was a lifelong Democrat and generously donated time and money to many causes.
21 According to Lewis Milestone, Pork Chop Hill (1959) was cut by nearly twenty minutes because Peck's wife felt that her husband made his first entrance too late into the picture. True or not, the film does show signs of post-production tampering, with flashes of several excised scenes showing up under the main title credits.
22 His picture appears on a nondenominated USA commemorative postage stamp in the Legends of Hollywood series, issued 28 April 2011. Peck is shown as the character Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). Price on day of issue was 44¢. First day of issue ceremonies were held at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
23 Grandfather of actor Ethan Peck.
24 Was offered but declined the role of Det. Steve McGarrett in Hawaii Five-O (1968).
25 In February 1955 Peck was set to star in The Proud Ones (1956), but the role was eventually played by Robert Ryan.
26 Was kept out of military service during WWII due to a back injury.
27 He visited Michael Jackson on the set of filming the "Smooth Criminal" segment for Moonwalker (1988). Also visiting the set was Robert De Niro and Bruce Willis.
28 He was a close friend of former French President Jacques Chirac.
29 Was the second choice to play Prof. Henry Jones Sr. in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), had first choice Sean Connery declined the role. Star Harrison Ford cited Peck as one of his favorite actors and To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) as one of his favorite films.
30 He regularly visited Humphrey Bogart while filming Designing Woman (1957) with Bogart's wife Lauren Bacall. Peck was reportedly devastated by the star's death in January 1957.
31 Biography in: "The Scribner Encyclopedia of American Lives". Volume 7, 2003-2005, pages 417-420. Farmington Hills, MI: Thomson Gale, 2007.
32 He was a close friend and ardent supporter of President Lyndon Johnson, spending much time at the White House and the Johnson Ranch.
33 While filming The Bravados (1958), he decided to become a cowboy in real life, so he purchased a vast working ranch near Santa Barbara, California - already stocked with 600 head of prize cattle.
34 His election as President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1967 was widely seen as heralding in a new, younger, progressive and decidedly liberal era of filmmaking in Hollywood.
35 In 1999 he publicly berated Congress for failing to pass legislation preventing teenagers from buying guns, following the Columbine high school massacre.
36 Personally chose Lewis Milestone to direct the anti-war movie Pork Chop Hill (1959), because Milestone's All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) had made a deep impression on him.
37 He was a lifelong opponent of nuclear weapons, and made On the Beach (1959) for this reason.
38 MGM wanted Peck to play Roger Thornhill in North by Northwest (1959), but the director Alfred Hitchcock thought Peck was too serious and cast Cary Grant instead.
39 Often stated how disappointed he was that many American viewers did not realize how anti-war The Guns of Navarone (1961) was.
40 In the early 1990s Peck considered writing his autobiography, however he decided against it when he realized he wasn't as good at writing as his friend David Niven.
41 One of his greatest heroes from childhood was President Abraham Lincoln. Peck was initially concerned about playing him in The Blue and the Gray (1982), since at 66 he was a decade older than Lincoln was when he was assassinated. Some 17 years later, when he was the director Rod Lurie 's first choice to play the role of a fictional U.S. President in The Contender (2000), he declined saying he was 'too damn old.'.
42 He was considered for Rock Hudson's role in Ice Station Zebra (1968).
43 By 1974, following a series of flops, Peck's career had declined to such an extent that he admitted in an interview that he was thinking of retiring from acting. Two years later however he made an enormous comeback with The Omen (1976).
44 Agreed to star in David and Bathsheba (1951) as a riposte to the Biblical epics of Cecil B. DeMille.
45 His mother died in May 1992 at the age of 97.
46 In December 2002 Peck visited his wife in hospital in Los Angeles after she underwent surgery to relieve pressure on two vertebrae. The sight of the veteran actor in hospital sparked more press rumors that he was seriously ill.
47 A physically powerful man, Peck was known to do a majority of his own fight scenes, rarely using body or stunt doubles. Robert Mitchum, his on-screen opponent in Cape Fear (1962), said that Peck once accidentally punched him for real during their final fight scene in the movie. He recalled feeling the impact of the punch for days afterwards and said, "I don't feel sorry for anyone dumb enough who picks a fight with him.".
48 In 1999, the American Film Institute named Peck among the Greatest Male Stars of All Time, ranking at No. 12.
49 His favorite drink was Guinness, which he drank every day. Eventually he had a tap installed in the bar at his house.
50 His favorite singers were Frank Sinatra and Michael Jackson. He was also a big fan of Elton John.
51 Formed a solid friendship with Mary Badham, who played his daughter "Scout" in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). They remained in contact until his passing. According to Badham, she always called him "Atticus" and he always called her "Scout".
52 He had always wanted to act in a Shakespearean play, but by the time the opportunity presented itself in 1951 he decided it was too late to start.
53 Son of Gregory Pearl Peck and wife Bernice Mae Ayres.
54 Turned down Yves Montand's role in Let's Make Love (1960) because he didn't want to work with Marilyn Monroe.
55 When he was the President of the Academy of Motion Pictures and Science, he tried his hardest to get a full-length animated feature film (most notably the The Jungle Book (1967)) not only nominated for Best Picture Academy Award but actually win the award. He resigned as President in 1970 when other members didn't agree with him about animated films being nominated for the award. Twenty-one years after he resigned Beauty and the Beast (1991) became the first animated film to be nominated for Best Picture although it did not win.
56 Only the Valiant (1951) was his least favorite film. He thought the western potboiler was a step backwards after starring in The Gunfighter (1950).
57 The financial failure of Cape Fear (1962) ended his company, Melville Productions.
58 In 1996, veteran character actor Richard Jaeckel, Peck's costar in The Gunfighter (1950), was diagnosed with cancer, and Jaeckel's wife had Alzheimer's disease. The Jaeckels had lost their Brentwood home, were over $1 million in debt, and Jaeckel was basically homeless. His family tried unsuccessfully to enter him into Woodland Hills Motion Picture and Television Hospital. Peck lobbied for Jaeckel's admittance and he was treated within three days. Jaeckel stayed in the hospital until his passing in June 1997.
59 He is listed in the Cal Berkeley Alumni roster as a graduate of the Class of 1942 who studied as an English major and where he acted in plays at the Associated Students sponsored 'Little Theatre' on campus. Incidentally while under the watch of the University's Committee on Music and Drama led by Professor William Popper as chairman, the University's Department of Dramatic Arts was just being established towards the end of his student tenure in 1941.
60 After making Arabesque (1966), Peck withdrew from acting for three years in order to concentrate on various humanitarian causes, including the American Cancer Society.
61 He did not get along with director Elia Kazan while filming Gentleman's Agreement (1947). Kazan told the press he was very disappointed with Peck's performance and the two men never worked together again.
62 Campaigned for Harry S. Truman in the 1948 presidential election.
63 He was originally cast in the role played by Robert Taylor in Quo Vadis (1951).
64 His few attempts to play a villain were considered unsuccessful, perhaps because the public could not accept Peck as anything other than good. He was considered too young at 38 (the movie was filmed in 1954) to play Captain Ahab in Moby Dick (1956), especially since the character was described in Herman Melville's novel as an old man. Peck admitted he only agreed to play Nazi Dr Josef Mengele in The Boys from Brazil (1978) because he wanted to work with Sir Laurence Olivier. Although the film and his performance were savaged by the critics, Peck remained loyal to it.
65 He was a heavy drinker as a young actor in Hollywood. In 1949 he was hospitalized with heart spasms, and while filming David and Bathsheba (1951) he was hospitalized with a suspected heart attack. Though it turned out to be a palpitation brought on by his lifestyle and overwork, he began to drink less thereafter. However, he did not stop smoking for many more years.
66 In 1948, amid the anti-Communist hysteria sweeping the country during the McCarthy "Red Scare" era, he was called before a "fact finding committee" set up by the California Legislature to ferret out alleged Communists and their sympathizers in the entertainment industry. He was summoned because of his association with a host of "liberal" organizations and causes, along with several other stars. He gave the committee a list of every organization to which he had contributed money, along with their letterheads, and said that he contributed to them because they were legitimate organizations. He told the committee, "I am not now and never have been associated with any communist organization or supporters of communism. I am not a communist, never was a communist and I have no sympathy with communist activities".
67 He was given the role of Ambassador Robert Thorn in The Omen (1976) after Charlton Heston turned it down in order to make Midway (1976).
68 In his 80s his frail and thin appearance frequently sparked press rumors of his impending death, particularly when in 2001 he attended Jack Lemmon's funeral with his head bandaged from a recent fall.
69 As a board member of Handgun Control Inc. (along with Martin Sheen and Susan Sarandon), Peck was sometimes criticized for his friendship with Charlton Heston, a longtime advocate of gun ownership who served as President of the National Rifle Assocation (NRA) from 1998 to 2003. When questioned by James Brady, Peck said, "We're colleagues rather than friends. We're civil to each other when we meet. I, of course, disagree vehemently with him on gun control.".
70 After Peck stormed off the set of The Big Country (1958), director William Wyler said of him: "I wouldn't direct Peck again for a million dollars and you can quote me on that.".
71 Appeared on President Richard Nixon's infamous "List of Enemies" in 1972.
72 During the Vietnam War Peck was a vocal supporter of teenagers who dodged the draft, calling them "patriots" and "heroes" and saying that burning their draft cards was part of their civic duty. He produced an anti-war film, The Trial of the Catonsville Nine (1972) using his own money in order to provoke more opposition to the conflict.
73 In 1946 he met and befriended Gary Cooper, with whom he was often compared in terms of looks and acting style.
74 Advertised Chesterfield cigarettes.
75 He was an active supporter of AIDS fund raising.
76 He was a close friend of Jane Fonda, and frequently attended political rallies with her.
77 In 1987 he joined Burt Lancaster, Martin Sheen and Lloyd Bridges in narrating a TV commercial for the People for the American Way, opposing the confirmation of President Ronald Reagan's nominee to the Supreme Court, ultra-conservative judge Robert Bork. Bork, who came under intense criticism in part because of his past vociferous opposition to civil rights laws, ultimately failed to be confirmed by the Senate.
78 He was a close friend of Michael Jackson for the last 25 years of his life, and often went horse riding with the singer at his Neverland Ranch. During the Jordie Chandler scandal in 1993, Peck wrote a letter defending Jackson. He also gave a glowing video tribute to Jackson at his 30th Anniversary concert in New York in 2001.
79 In 1999 he supported the decision to give Elia Kazan an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement, saying he believed that a man's work should be separate from his life.
80 Turned down Gary Cooper's Oscar-winning role as Marshal Will Kane in High Noon (1952) because he felt the story was too similar to his The Gunfighter (1950). When the film proved to be a huge success Peck admitted he had made a mistake, though he said he didn't believe he could have played the character as well as Cooper.
81 Broke his ankle in three places in a fall from a horse while filming Yellow Sky (1948).
82 In 1947, at the beginning of the anti-communist investigations in Hollywood, Peck signed a letter deploring the witch hunts despite being warned his signature could hurt his career.
83 He was a vocal opponent of the Vietnam War, while remaining supportive of his son who was serving there.
84 In the 1950s, the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum near Tucson, AZ, named one of their male javalinas "Gregory Peckory" in his honor; incidentally, their female was named "Olivia de Javalina" to honor actress Olivia de Havilland.
85 He had always wanted to do a Walt Disney movie.
86 Mourners for the public service held after his burial held huge black-and-white portraits of Peck as they approached the Cathedral, designed by artist/sculptor Robert Graham, husband of Anjelica Huston. Church officials estimated that almost 3,000 people attended. Seats were reserved for Peck's friends, a sizable number of whom were celebrities - they were instructed to whisper the secret password "Atticus" to the red-coated ushers who escorted them to the reserved section - Harry Belafonte, Anjelica Huston, Michael York, Louise Fletcher, Tony Danza, Piper Laurie, Harrison Ford, Calista Flockhart. Michael Jackson, wearing a red jacket, caused a stir when he arrived 20 minutes late. Decked out in a bright blue suit and clutching a program with Peck's picture on it was his first wife Greta, looking hale and hearty at 92. Roger Mahony, Archbishop of Los Angeles, presided over the service. The program included bible readings by Peck's children Carey, Cecilia and Tony. Mahoney said, "He lived his life authentically, as God called and willed him and placed him in his room, with gifts and talents." Brock Peters, who played the black man defended by Peck's character Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), delivered the eulogy. The film spawned a close friendship between the two stars that lasted more than 40 years. "In art there is compassion," said Peters, "in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure." The crowd visibly warmed to a videotape performance of Peck featuring a lecture he gave several years before. He said he hoped to be remembered first as a good husband, father and grandfather. Then, with quiet strength and unforgettable presence, he added: "I'd like to be thought of as a good storyteller".
87 In 1997, as a presenter at the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) awards ceremony, he said, "It just seems silly to me that something so right and simple has to be fought for at all."
88 Once owned a thoroughbred named "Different Class," who was the favorite in the 1968 Grand National Steeplechase in the UK - but finished 3rd.
89 Cited that his favorite leading ladies were Audrey Hepburn, Ingrid Bergman, and Ava Gardner.
90 His performance as Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) is ranked #13 on Premiere Magazine's 100 Greatest Movie Characters of All Time.
91 Was Warner Bros. original choice to play Grandpa Joe in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005). He was offered the role and seriously considered it but passed away before he could give them an answer.
92 He was awarded the American National Medal of the Arts in 1998 by the National Endowment of the Arts in Washington D.C.
93 Father-in-law of Daniel Voll.
94 Studied acting with Michael Chekhov
95 In the spring of 1939, Peck skipped graduation at the University of California at Berkeley and, with $160 and a letter of introduction in his pocket, went by train to New York, traveling coach, to embark on his acting career.
96 He and The Big Country (1958) co-star Charlton Heston both played the infamous Nazi war criminal Dr. Josef Mengele: Peck in The Boys from Brazil (1978), Heston in Rua Alguem 5555: My Father (2003).
97 In late November of 2005, thieves stole Peck's "Hollywood Walk of Fame" star using a cement saw to cut the bronze-and-terrazzo marker out of the sidewalk. In a simple ceremony, a new star honoring the late actor was unveiled on December 1st to replace the stolen one. Hollywood's honorary mayor Johnny Grant lifted a covering and announced, "Ladies and gentlemen, we proudly welcome back to the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Gregory Peck." Peck's star was the fourth to be stolen since the Walk of Fame was inaugurated. James Stewart's and Kirk Douglas' stars disappeared some years ago after being removed for construction and were later recovered by police in the nearby city of South Gate. Gene Autry's star also vanished during a construction project. A call saying it had been found in Iowa proved to be a false alarm.
98 Named the #12 greatest actor on The 50 Greatest Screen Legends list by the American Film Institute
99 He was voted the 27th Greatest Movie Star of all time by Premiere Magazine.
100 Attended San Diego High School.
101 He was voted the 58th Greatest Movie Star of all time by Entertainment Weekly.
102 While studying at UC Berkeley, Peck was a houseboy for the school's chapter of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority.
103 According to at least one biography, he took his role in The Omen (1976) at a huge cut in salary (a mere $250,000) but was guaranteed 10% of the film's box office take. It went on to gross more than $60 million in the U.S. alone, and became the film for which he earned the most money in his career.
104 When he arrived in Italy to shoot Roman Holiday (1953), Gregory was privately depressed about his recent separation and imminent divorce from his first wife, Greta. However, during the shoot, he met and fell in love with a French woman named Veronique Peck. After his divorce, he married Passani and they remained together for the rest of his life. So, in a way, he lived out his own "movie romance".
105 Son, Stephen did a tour in Vietnam with the Marine Corps. Peck was proud of his son's military service even though he disagreed with the war itself.
106 Inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers of the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in 1979.
107 A back injury incurred in college kept him out of the services in World War II.
108 Was the first native Californian to win an Academy Award for Best Actor.
109 Brock Peters delivered his eulogy on the day of his funeral and burial, June 16, 2003. In To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), Peters played Tom Robinson, the black man accused of raping a white girl that Atticus Finch (Peck's character) defended in court.
110 During his lean salad days, he supported himself as a Radio City Music Hall tour guide and as a catalog model for Montgomery Ward.
111 Along with Dorothy McGuire, Mel Ferrer and David O. Selznick, he co-founded the La Jolla Playhouse, located in his hometown, and produced many of the classics there. Due to film commitments, he could not return to Broadway but whet his appetite for live theater on occasion at the Playhouse, keeping it firmly established with a strong, reputable name over the years.
112 His character from To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), Atticus Finch, was voted the greatest screen hero of all time by the American Film Institute in May 2003, only two weeks before his death (beating out Indiana Jones, who was placed second, and James Bond who came third).
113 Marched with Martin Luther King.
114 Seriously considered challenging then California Governor Ronald Reagan's re-election campaign in 1970 but decided against it at the last minute despite state and national pressure from the Democrat Party of California and The Democratic National Committee.
115 His ancestry included Irish, English, some German, and distant Welsh. His paternal grandparents were Samuel Peck and Catherine Ashe, and his maternal grandparents were John Daggett Ayers and Katherine Elizabeth Forse. His paternal grandmother was an immigrant from County Kerry, Ireland. She was a relative of Thomas Ashe, an Irish patriot who fought in the Easter Rising in 1916 and died on hunger strike the following year. Many of Gregory's other ancestors were from families that had lived in New England since the 1600s.
116 Chosen by producer Darryl F. Zanuck for the epic film David and Bathsheba (1951) because Zanuck thought Peck had a "biblical face".
117 Was president of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences from 1967-1970. He made the decision to postpone the 1968 Oscar ceremony after Martin Luther King's assassination.
118 Honorary chair, Los Angeles Library Foundation.
119 Was in the original version of Cape Fear (1962) in 1962, playing Sam Bowden. He was later brought back for a part in another version of Cape Fear (1991), playing Max Cady's attorney.
120 He took in former co-star Ava Gardner's housekeeper and dog after her death in 1990.
121 Stating he was worried about the 600,000 jobs hanging on the survival of the Chrysler Corporation, he volunteered to become an unpaid TV pitchman for the company in 1980.
122 (1967-1969) Chairman, American Film Institute. He was the first Chairman of the AFI.
123 (1964-1966) Charter Member, National Council on the Arts.
124 National Chairman, American Cancer Society.
125 (1968-1974) Charter Member, National Council on the Arts.
126 Recipient, Presidential Medal of Freedom, nation's highest civilian award, awarded by Lyndon Johnson.
127 Chairman, Motion Picture & Television Relief Fund.
128 Oldest son, Jon, committed suicide by gunshot.
129 Children with Veronique Peck: Tony Peck (b. 1956) and Cecilia Peck (b. 1958).
130 Children, with Greta Kukkonen: Jonathan Peck (b. 1944 - d. 1975), Stephen Peck (b. 1946) and Carey Paul Peck (b. 1949).
131 Of his own movies, To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) is Peck's favourite.
132 U.C. Berkeley graduate (BA '39), oarsman on Cal's JV crew.
133 His earliest movie memory is of being so scared by The Phantom of the Opera (1925) at age 9 that his grandmother allowed him to sleep in the bed with her that night.
134 Along with Peter Ustinov, Peck delivered the eulogy for friend and two-time co-star David Niven.
135 He shared an April 5 birthday with double Oscar winners Melvyn Douglas, Spencer Tracy, and Bette Davis.
136 Injured his spine in a physical training class resulting in his having to wear a back brace for six years and a World War II exemption. "I can ride horses, but I can't pick up a suitcase.".
137 His favourite director was Henry King and his favourite co-star was Ava Gardner.
138 The two people he regretted most not working with are John Ford and Greta Garbo.
139 Peck's father encouraged him to take up medicine but his grades weren't good enough for Berlely. He later took a public speaking course at San Diego State which was his introduction to acting.
140 Peck's first effort as producer, "Thieves' Market," in which he planned to star with Ava Gardner, was abandoned because "we were unable to develop the script properly.".
141 Peck spent time early in his career working at the Barter Theatre in Abingdon, VA - the State Theatre of Virginia. A picture hangs in the theatre of him with an old pickup truck, showing how he worked both behind the scenes as well as on stage. The Barter also boasts stints from Ernest Borgnine, Patricia Neal, Larry Linville, and Kevin Spacey.
142 John Wayne reportedly turned down two of Peck's most iconic roles: The Gunfighter (1950) and Twelve O'Clock High (1949).
143 Strongly disliked his first name of Eldred, a name his mother insisted on giving him because she felt it was distinct and would distinguish him with its uniqueness, but to him it felt like an awkward and difficult name to use casually. Early in adulthood he made it a point of using his middle name of Gregory, which he used for the rest of his life.
144 Was awarded the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1967.
145 Owned a race horse called Owen Sedge which he saw come 7th in the 1963 Grand National. He then flew back to the States to attended the Oscar ceremony and won Best Actor Award for To Kill a Mockingbird (1962).
146 Became friends with Audrey Hepburn after working with her in Roman Holiday (1953). Peck successfully persuaded Paramount executives to give her top billing rather than "Introducing" credit, because he strongly believed the film would make her a star. Indeed, Hepburn would win the Academy Award for Best Actress at the 1954 Oscars and they both remained close until her death in 1993. That same year, Peck presented her son Sean H. Ferrer with the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in recognition for her work with UNICEF.
147 Travelling in Alabama making campaign appearances for Democratic U.S. Senate Candidate Donald W. Stewart, who was running in a special election to complete the term of U.S. Senator James B. Allen, who had died in office. Stewart won the seat. [October 1978]
148 Mark Waid and Alex Ross based the design of the older Bruce Wayne/Batman on Peck for Their seminal 1996 graphic novel ''Kingdom Come''. Frank Miller also based the design of young Bruce in his iconic story ''Batman: Year One''.
149 Orson Welles had once hoped to make a film of the DC Comics hero Batman with Peck in the lead role but the project never came to fruition. This was revealed to have been a hoax.
150 Is one of 8 actors who have received an Oscar nomination for their performance as a priest. The others, in chronological order, are: Spencer Tracy for San Francisco (1936) and Boys Town (1938); Charles Bickford for The Song of Bernadette (1943); Bing Crosby for Going My Way (1944) and The Bells of St. Mary's (1945); Barry Fitzgerald for Going My Way (1944); Karl Malden for On the Waterfront (1954); Jason Miller for The Exorcist (1973); and Philip Seymour Hoffman for Doubt (2008). Tracy, Crosby and Fitzgerald all won Oscars for their performances.
151 The name "Gregory Peck" is used as the Cockney Rhyming Slang for neck (as used traditionally by the inhabitants of East London), so the expression "Get it down your Gregory" means "Drink this!".
152 Was a lifelong Democrat and generously donated time and money to many causes.
153 According to Lewis Milestone, Pork Chop Hill (1959) was cut by nearly twenty minutes because Peck's wife felt that her husband made his first entrance too late into the picture. True or not, the film does show signs of post-production tampering, with flashes of several excised scenes showing up under the main title credits.
154 His picture appears on a nondenominated USA commemorative postage stamp in the Legends of Hollywood series, issued 28 April 2011. Peck is shown as the character Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). Price on day of issue was 44¢. First day of issue ceremonies were held at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
155 Grandfather of actor Ethan Peck.
156 Was offered but declined the role of Det. Steve McGarrett in Hawaii Five-O (1968).
157 In February 1955 Peck was set to star in The Proud Ones (1956), but the role was eventually played by Robert Ryan.
158 Was kept out of military service during WWII due to a back injury.
159 He visited Michael Jackson on the set of filming the "Smooth Criminal" segment for Moonwalker (1988). Also visiting the set was Robert De Niro and Bruce Willis.
160 He was a close friend of former French President Jacques Chirac.
161 Was the second choice to play Prof. Henry Jones Sr. in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), had first choice Sean Connery declined the role. Star Harrison Ford cited Peck as one of his favorite actors and To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) as one of his favorite films.
162 He regularly visited Humphrey Bogart while filming Designing Woman (1957) with Bogart's wife Lauren Bacall. Peck was reportedly devastated by the star's death in January 1957.
163 Biography in: "The Scribner Encyclopedia of American Lives". Volume 7, 2003-2005, pages 417-420. Farmington Hills, MI: Thomson Gale, 2007.
164 He was a close friend and ardent supporter of President Lyndon Johnson, spending much time at the White House and the Johnson Ranch.
165 While filming The Bravados (1958), he decided to become a cowboy in real life, so he purchased a vast working ranch near Santa Barbara, California - already stocked with 600 head of prize cattle.
166 His election as President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1967 was widely seen as heralding in a new, younger, progressive and decidedly liberal era of filmmaking in Hollywood.
167 In 1999 he publicly berated Congress for failing to pass legislation preventing teenagers from buying guns, following the Columbine high school massacre.
168 Personally chose Lewis Milestone to direct the anti-war movie Pork Chop Hill (1959), because Milestone's All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) had made a deep impression on him.
169 He was a lifelong opponent of nuclear weapons, and made On the Beach (1959) for this reason.
170 MGM wanted Peck to play Roger Thornhill in North by Northwest (1959), but the director Alfred Hitchcock thought Peck was too serious and cast Cary Grant instead.
171 Often stated how disappointed he was that many American viewers did not realize how anti-war The Guns of Navarone (1961) was.
172 In the early 1990s Peck considered writing his autobiography, however he decided against it when he realized he wasn't as good at writing as his friend David Niven.
173 One of his greatest heroes from childhood was President Abraham Lincoln. Peck was initially concerned about playing him in The Blue and the Gray (1982), since at 66 he was a decade older than Lincoln was when he was assassinated. Some 17 years later, when he was the director Rod Lurie 's first choice to play the role of a fictional U.S. President in The Contender (2000), he declined saying he was 'too damn old.'.
174 He was considered for Rock Hudson's role in Ice Station Zebra (1968).
175 By 1974, following a series of flops, Peck's career had declined to such an extent that he admitted in an interview that he was thinking of retiring from acting. Two years later however he made an enormous comeback with The Omen (1976).
176 Agreed to star in David and Bathsheba (1951) as a riposte to the Biblical epics of Cecil B. DeMille.
177 His mother died in May 1992 at the age of 97.
178 In December 2002 Peck visited his wife in hospital in Los Angeles after she underwent surgery to relieve pressure on two vertebrae. The sight of the veteran actor in hospital sparked more press rumors that he was seriously ill.
179 A physically powerful man, Peck was known to do a majority of his own fight scenes, rarely using body or stunt doubles. Robert Mitchum, his on-screen opponent in Cape Fear (1962), said that Peck once accidentally punched him for real during their final fight scene in the movie. He recalled feeling the impact of the punch for days afterwards and said, "I don't feel sorry for anyone dumb enough who picks a fight with him.".
180 In 1999, the American Film Institute named Peck among the Greatest Male Stars of All Time, ranking at No. 12.
181 His favorite drink was Guinness, which he drank every day. Eventually he had a tap installed in the bar at his house.
182 His favorite singers were Frank Sinatra and Michael Jackson. He was also a big fan of Elton John.
183 Formed a solid friendship with Mary Badham, who played his daughter "Scout" in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). They remained in contact until his passing. According to Badham, she always called him "Atticus" and he always called her "Scout".
184 He had always wanted to act in a Shakespearean play, but by the time the opportunity presented itself in 1951 he decided it was too late to start.
185 Son of Gregory Pearl Peck and wife Bernice Mae Ayres.
186 Turned down Yves Montand's role in Let's Make Love (1960) because he didn't want to work with Marilyn Monroe.
187 When he was the President of the Academy of Motion Pictures and Science, he tried his hardest to get a full-length animated feature film (most notably the The Jungle Book (1967)) not only nominated for Best Picture Academy Award but actually win the award. He resigned as President in 1970 when other members didn't agree with him about animated films being nominated for the award. Twenty-one years after he resigned Beauty and the Beast (1991) became the first animated film to be nominated for Best Picture although it did not win.
188 Only the Valiant (1951) was his least favorite film. He thought the western potboiler was a step backwards after starring in The Gunfighter (1950).
189 The financial failure of Cape Fear (1962) ended his company, Melville Productions.
190 In 1996, veteran character actor Richard Jaeckel, Peck's costar in The Gunfighter (1950), was diagnosed with cancer, and Jaeckel's wife had Alzheimer's disease. The Jaeckels had lost their Brentwood home, were over $1 million in debt, and Jaeckel was basically homeless. His family tried unsuccessfully to enter him into Woodland Hills Motion Picture and Television Hospital. Peck lobbied for Jaeckel's admittance and he was treated within three days. Jaeckel stayed in the hospital until his passing in June 1997.
191 He is listed in the Cal Berkeley Alumni roster as a graduate of the Class of 1942 who studied as an English major and where he acted in plays at the Associated Students sponsored 'Little Theatre' on campus. Incidentally while under the watch of the University's Committee on Music and Drama led by Professor William Popper as chairman, the University's Department of Dramatic Arts was just being established towards the end of his student tenure in 1941.
192 After making Arabesque (1966), Peck withdrew from acting for three years in order to concentrate on various humanitarian causes, including the American Cancer Society.
193 He did not get along with director Elia Kazan while filming Gentleman's Agreement (1947). Kazan told the press he was very disappointed with Peck's performance and the two men never worked together again.
194 Campaigned for Harry S. Truman in the 1948 presidential election.
195 He was originally cast in the role played by Robert Taylor in Quo Vadis (1951).
196 His few attempts to play a villain were considered unsuccessful, perhaps because the public could not accept Peck as anything other than good. He was considered too young at 38 (the movie was filmed in 1954) to play Captain Ahab in Moby Dick (1956), especially since the character was described in Herman Melville's novel as an old man. Peck admitted he only agreed to play Nazi Dr Josef Mengele in The Boys from Brazil (1978) because he wanted to work with Sir Laurence Olivier. Although the film and his performance were savaged by the critics, Peck remained loyal to it.
197 He was a heavy drinker as a young actor in Hollywood. In 1949 he was hospitalized with heart spasms, and while filming David and Bathsheba (1951) he was hospitalized with a suspected heart attack. Though it turned out to be a palpitation brought on by his lifestyle and overwork, he began to drink less thereafter. However, he did not stop smoking for many more years.
198 In 1948, amid the anti-Communist hysteria sweeping the country during the McCarthy "Red Scare" era, he was called before a "fact finding committee" set up by the California Legislature to ferret out alleged Communists and their sympathizers in the entertainment industry. He was summoned because of his association with a host of "liberal" organizations and causes, along with several other stars. He gave the committee a list of every organization to which he had contributed money, along with their letterheads, and said that he contributed to them because they were legitimate organizations. He told the committee, "I am not now and never have been associated with any communist organization or supporters of communism. I am not a communist, never was a communist and I have no sympathy with communist activities".
199 He was given the role of Ambassador Robert Thorn in The Omen (1976) after Charlton Heston turned it down in order to make Midway (1976).
200 In his 80s his frail and thin appearance frequently sparked press rumors of his impending death, particularly when in 2001 he attended Jack Lemmon's funeral with his head bandaged from a recent fall.
201 As a board member of Handgun Control Inc. (along with Martin Sheen and Susan Sarandon), Peck was sometimes criticized for his friendship with Charlton Heston, a longtime advocate of gun ownership who served as President of the National Rifle Assocation (NRA) from 1998 to 2003. When questioned by James Brady, Peck said, "We're colleagues rather than friends. We're civil to each other when we meet. I, of course, disagree vehemently with him on gun control.".
202 After Peck stormed off the set of The Big Country (1958), director William Wyler said of him: "I wouldn't direct Peck again for a million dollars and you can quote me on that.".
203 Appeared on President Richard Nixon's infamous "List of Enemies" in 1972.
204 During the Vietnam War Peck was a vocal supporter of teenagers who dodged the draft, calling them "patriots" and "heroes" and saying that burning their draft cards was part of their civic duty. He produced an anti-war film, The Trial of the Catonsville Nine (1972) using his own money in order to provoke more opposition to the conflict.
205 In 1946 he met and befriended Gary Cooper, with whom he was often compared in terms of looks and acting style.
206 Advertised Chesterfield cigarettes.
207 He was an active supporter of AIDS fund raising.
208 He was a close friend of Jane Fonda, and frequently attended political rallies with her.
209 In 1987 he joined Burt Lancaster, Martin Sheen and Lloyd Bridges in narrating a TV commercial for the People for the American Way, opposing the confirmation of President Ronald Reagan's nominee to the Supreme Court, ultra-conservative judge Robert Bork. Bork, who came under intense criticism in part because of his past vociferous opposition to civil rights laws, ultimately failed to be confirmed by the Senate.
210 He was a close friend of Michael Jackson for the last 25 years of his life, and often went horse riding with the singer at his Neverland Ranch. During the Jordie Chandler scandal in 1993, Peck wrote a letter defending Jackson. He also gave a glowing video tribute to Jackson at his 30th Anniversary concert in New York in 2001.
211 In 1999 he supported the decision to give Elia Kazan an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement, saying he believed that a man's work should be separate from his life.
212 Turned down Gary Cooper's Oscar-winning role as Marshal Will Kane in High Noon (1952) because he felt the story was too similar to his The Gunfighter (1950). When the film proved to be a huge success Peck admitted he had made a mistake, though he said he didn't believe he could have played the character as well as Cooper.
213 Broke his ankle in three places in a fall from a horse while filming Yellow Sky (1948).
214 In 1947, at the beginning of the anti-communist investigations in Hollywood, Peck signed a letter deploring the witch hunts despite being warned his signature could hurt his career.
215 He was a vocal opponent of the Vietnam War, while remaining supportive of his son who was serving there.
216 In the 1950s, the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum near Tucson, AZ, named one of their male javalinas "Gregory Peckory" in his honor; incidentally, their female was named "Olivia de Javalina" to honor actress Olivia de Havilland.
217 He had always wanted to do a Walt Disney movie.
218 Mourners for the public service held after his burial held huge black-and-white portraits of Peck as they approached the Cathedral, designed by artist/sculptor Robert Graham, husband of Anjelica Huston. Church officials estimated that almost 3,000 people attended. Seats were reserved for Peck's friends, a sizable number of whom were celebrities - they were instructed to whisper the secret password "Atticus" to the red-coated ushers who escorted them to the reserved section - Harry Belafonte, Anjelica Huston, Michael York, Louise Fletcher, Tony Danza, Piper Laurie, Harrison Ford, Calista Flockhart. Michael Jackson, wearing a red jacket, caused a stir when he arrived 20 minutes late. Decked out in a bright blue suit and clutching a program with Peck's picture on it was his first wife Greta, looking hale and hearty at 92. Roger Mahony, Archbishop of Los Angeles, presided over the service. The program included bible readings by Peck's children Carey, Cecilia and Tony. Mahoney said, "He lived his life authentically, as God called and willed him and placed him in his room, with gifts and talents." Brock Peters, who played the black man defended by Peck's character Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), delivered the eulogy. The film spawned a close friendship between the two stars that lasted more than 40 years. "In art there is compassion," said Peters, "in compassion there is humanity, with humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure." The crowd visibly warmed to a videotape performance of Peck featuring a lecture he gave several years before. He said he hoped to be remembered first as a good husband, father and grandfather. Then, with quiet strength and unforgettable presence, he added: "I'd like to be thought of as a good storyteller".
219 In 1997, as a presenter at the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) awards ceremony, he said, "It just seems silly to me that something so right and simple has to be fought for at all."
220 Once owned a thoroughbred named "Different Class," who was the favorite in the 1968 Grand National Steeplechase in the UK - but finished 3rd.
221 Cited that his favorite leading ladies were Audrey Hepburn, Ingrid Bergman, and Ava Gardner.
222 His performance as Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) is ranked #13 on Premiere Magazine's 100 Greatest Movie Characters of All Time.
223 Was Warner Bros. original choice to play Grandpa Joe in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005). He was offered the role and seriously considered it but passed away before he could give them an answer.
224 He was awarded the American National Medal of the Arts in 1998 by the National Endowment of the Arts in Washington D.C.
225 Father-in-law of Daniel Voll.
226 Studied acting with Michael Chekhov
227 In the spring of 1939, Peck skipped graduation at the University of California at Berkeley and, with $160 and a letter of introduction in his pocket, went by train to New York, traveling coach, to embark on his acting career.
228 He and The Big Country (1958) co-star Charlton Heston both played the infamous Nazi war criminal Dr. Josef Mengele: Peck in The Boys from Brazil (1978), Heston in Rua Alguem 5555: My Father (2003).
229 In late November of 2005, thieves stole Peck's "Hollywood Walk of Fame" star using a cement saw to cut the bronze-and-terrazzo marker out of the sidewalk. In a simple ceremony, a new star honoring the late actor was unveiled on December 1st to replace the stolen one. Hollywood's honorary mayor Johnny Grant lifted a covering and announced, "Ladies and gentlemen, we proudly welcome back to the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Gregory Peck." Peck's star was the fourth to be stolen since the Walk of Fame was inaugurated. James Stewart's and Kirk Douglas' stars disappeared some years ago after being removed for construction and were later recovered by police in the nearby city of South Gate. Gene Autry's star also vanished during a construction project. A call saying it had been found in Iowa proved to be a false alarm.
230 Named the #12 greatest actor on The 50 Greatest Screen Legends list by the American Film Institute
231 He was voted the 27th Greatest Movie Star of all time by Premiere Magazine.
232 Attended San Diego High School.
233 He was voted the 58th Greatest Movie Star of all time by Entertainment Weekly.
234 While studying at UC Berkeley, Peck was a houseboy for the school's chapter of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority.
235 According to at least one biography, he took his role in The Omen (1976) at a huge cut in salary (a mere $250,000) but was guaranteed 10% of the film's box office take. It went on to gross more than $60 million in the U.S. alone, and became the film for which he earned the most money in his career.
236 When he arrived in Italy to shoot Roman Holiday (1953), Gregory was privately depressed about his recent separation and imminent divorce from his first wife, Greta. However, during the shoot, he met and fell in love with a French woman named Veronique Peck. After his divorce, he married Passani and they remained together for the rest of his life. So, in a way, he lived out his own "movie romance".
237 Son, Stephen did a tour in Vietnam with the Marine Corps. Peck was proud of his son's military service even though he disagreed with the war itself.
238 Inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers of the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in 1979.
239 A back injury incurred in college kept him out of the services in World War II.
240 Was the first native Californian to win an Academy Award for Best Actor.
241 Brock Peters delivered his eulogy on the day of his funeral and burial, June 16, 2003. In To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), Peters played Tom Robinson, the black man accused of raping a white girl that Atticus Finch (Peck's character) defended in court.
242 During his lean salad days, he supported himself as a Radio City Music Hall tour guide and as a catalog model for Montgomery Ward.
243 Along with Dorothy McGuire, Mel Ferrer and David O. Selznick, he co-founded the La Jolla Playhouse, located in his hometown, and produced many of the classics there. Due to film commitments, he could not return to Broadway but whet his appetite for live theater on occasion at the Playhouse, keeping it firmly established with a strong, reputable name over the years.
244 His character from To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), Atticus Finch, was voted the greatest screen hero of all time by the American Film Institute in May 2003, only two weeks before his death (beating out Indiana Jones, who was placed second, and James Bond who came third).
245 Marched with Martin Luther King.
246 Seriously considered challenging then California Governor Ronald Reagan's re-election campaign in 1970 but decided against it at the last minute despite state and national pressure from the Democrat Party of California and The Democratic National Committee.
247 His ancestry included Irish, English, some German, and distant Welsh. His paternal grandparents were Samuel Peck and Catherine Ashe, and his maternal grandparents were John Daggett Ayers and Katherine Elizabeth Forse. His paternal grandmother was an immigrant from County Kerry, Ireland. She was a relative of Thomas Ashe, an Irish patriot who fought in the Easter Rising in 1916 and died on hunger strike the following year. Many of Gregory's other ancestors were from families that had lived in New England since the 1600s.
248 Chosen by producer Darryl F. Zanuck for the epic film David and Bathsheba (1951) because Zanuck thought Peck had a "biblical face".
249 Was president of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences from 1967-1970. He made the decision to postpone the 1968 Oscar ceremony after Martin Luther King's assassination.
250 Honorary chair, Los Angeles Library Foundation.
251 Was in the original version of Cape Fear (1962) in 1962, playing Sam Bowden. He was later brought back for a part in another version of Cape Fear (1991), playing Max Cady's attorney.
252 He took in former co-star Ava Gardner's housekeeper and dog after her death in 1990.
253 Stating he was worried about the 600,000 jobs hanging on the survival of the Chrysler Corporation, he volunteered to become an unpaid TV pitchman for the company in 1980.
254 (1967-1969) Chairman, American Film Institute. He was the first Chairman of the AFI.
255 (1964-1966) Charter Member, National Council on the Arts.
256 National Chairman, American Cancer Society.
257 (1968-1974) Charter Member, National Council on the Arts.
258 Recipient, Presidential Medal of Freedom, nation's highest civilian award, awarded by Lyndon Johnson.
259 Chairman, Motion Picture & Television Relief Fund.
260 Oldest son, Jon, committed suicide by gunshot.
261 Children with Veronique Peck: Tony Peck (b. 1956) and Cecilia Peck (b. 1958).
262 Children, with Greta Kukkonen: Jonathan Peck (b. 1944 - d. 1975), Stephen Peck (b. 1946) and Carey Paul Peck (b. 1949).
263 Of his own movies, To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) is Peck's favourite.
264 U.C. Berkeley graduate (BA '39), oarsman on Cal's JV crew.
265 His earliest movie memory is of being so scared by The Phantom of the Opera (1925) at age 9 that his grandmother allowed him to sleep in the bed with her that night.


Actor

Actor

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Moby Dick 1998 TV Mini-Series Father Mapple
The Portrait 1993 TV Movie Gardner Church
Cape Fear 1991 Lee Heller
Other People's Money 1991 Andrew Jorgenson
The Will Rogers Follies 1991 TV Movie Mr. Ziegfeld (voice)
Old Gringo 1989 Bitter
Amazing Grace and Chuck 1987 President
The Scarlet and the Black 1983 TV Movie Monsignor Hugh O'Flaherty
The Blue and the Gray 1982 TV Mini-Series Abraham Lincoln
The Sea Wolves 1980 Colonel Lewis Pugh
The Boys from Brazil 1978 Dr. Josef Mengele
MacArthur 1977 Gen. Douglas MacArthur
The Omen 1976 Robert Thorn
Billy Two Hats 1974 Arch Deans
Shoot Out 1971 Clay Lomax
I Walk the Line 1970 Sheriff Tawes
Marooned 1969 Charles Keith
The Chairman 1969 John Hathaway
Mackenna's Gold 1969 Sheriff Mackenna
The Stalking Moon 1968 Sam Varner
Arabesque 1966 Prof. David Pollock
Mirage 1965 David Stillwell
Behold a Pale Horse 1964 Manuel Artiguez
Captain Newman, M.D. 1963 Capt. Josiah J. Newman, MD
To Kill a Mockingbird 1962 Atticus Finch
How the West Was Won 1962 Cleve Van Valen
Cape Fear 1962 Sam Bowden
The Guns of Navarone 1961 Mallory
On the Beach 1959 Cmdr. Dwight Lionel Towers
Beloved Infidel 1959 F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pork Chop Hill 1959 Lt. Joe Clemons
The Big Country 1958 James McKay
The Bravados 1958 Jim Douglass
Designing Woman 1957 Mike Hagen
Moby Dick 1956 Captain Ahab
The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit 1956 Tom Rath
The Purple Plain 1954 Squadron Leader Bill Forrester
Night People 1954 Col. Steve Van Dyke
Man with a Million 1954 Henry Adams
Boum sur Paris 1953 Gregory Peck
Roman Holiday 1953 Joe Bradley
The Snows of Kilimanjaro 1952 Harry Street
The World in His Arms 1952 Capt. Jonathan Clark
David and Bathsheba 1951 King David
Only the Valiant 1951 Capt. Richard Lance
Captain Horatio Hornblower R.N. 1951 Capt. Horatio Hornblower R.N
The Gunfighter 1950 Jimmy Ringo
Twelve O'Clock High 1949 General Savage
The Great Sinner 1949 Fedja
Yellow Sky 1948 James 'Stretch' Dawson
The Paradine Case 1947 Anthony Keane
Gentleman's Agreement 1947 Philip Schuyler Green
The Macomber Affair 1947 Robert Wilson
Duel in the Sun 1946 Lewton 'Lewt' McCanles
The Yearling 1946 Penny Baxter
Spellbound 1945 John Ballantyne
The Valley of Decision 1945 Paul Scott
The Keys of the Kingdom 1944 Father Francis Chisholm
Days of Glory 1944 Vladimir

Producer

Producer

TitleYearStatusCharacter
The Portrait 1993 TV Movie executive producer
The 57th Annual Academy Awards 1985 TV Special documentary producer
The Dove 1974 producer
The Trial of the Catonsville Nine 1972 producer
Behold a Pale Horse 1964 producer - uncredited
Captain Newman, M.D. 1963 producer - uncredited
To Kill a Mockingbird 1962 producer - uncredited
Pork Chop Hill 1959 executive producer - uncredited
The Big Country 1958 producer
The Macomber Affair 1947 co-producer - uncredited

Soundtrack

Soundtrack

TitleYearStatusCharacter
The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit 1956 performer: "I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech" 1908 - uncredited
Man with a Million 1954 "Tempus adest floridum", uncredited / performer: "The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo" - uncredited
Duel in the Sun 1946 performer: "I've Been Working on the Railroad" - uncredited
The Valley of Decision 1945 "Pop! Goes the Weasel", uncredited

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

TitleYearStatusCharacter
American Masters 1999 TV Series documentary archive source - 1 episode

Thanks

Thanks

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Omaggio a Roma 2009 Short grateful thanks
Dreaming in Black and White 2002 special thanks
The Making of 'Cape Fear' 2001/I Video documentary special thanks

Self

Self

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Film '72 1989 TV Series Himself
Crossing Borders: The Journey of Carlos Fuentes 1989 TV Movie Himself
The 15th Annual People's Choice Awards 1989 TV Special Himself - Presenter
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Gregory Peck 1989 TV Special Himself - Guest of Honor
Moving Image Salutes Sidney Poitier 1989 TV Movie Himself
5th Annual TV Academy Hall of Fame 1989 TV Special Himself
The Princess Grace Foundation Special Gala Tribute to Cary Grant 1988 TV Movie Himself
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Jack Lemmon 1988 TV Special documentary Himself (uncredited)
The 60th Annual Academy Awards 1988 TV Special Himself - Presenter: Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay
Gregory Peck: His Own Man 1988 Documentary Himself
99th Tournament of Roses Parade 1988 TV Movie Himself
The Grammy Lifetime Achievment Award Show 1987 TV Movie Himself
We the People 200: The Constitutional Gala 1987 TV Movie Himself - Performer
Happy 100th Birthday, Hollywood 1987 TV Special documentary Himself
Liberty Weekend 1986 TV Special documentary Himself
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Billy Wilder 1986 TV Special documentary Himself
All-Star Party for 'Dutch' Reagan 1985 TV Special Himself
The Annual Friars Club Tribute Presents a Salute to Gene Kelly 1985 TV Movie Himself
An American Portrait 1985 TV Series documentary Himself - Host
The Annual American Technion Society's Albert Einstein Award 1985 TV Movie Himself
Olympic Gala 1984 TV Special documentary Himself - Guest
Gala Opening of the American Ballet Theater 1984 TV Movie Himself
James Bond: The First 21 Years 1983 TV Movie documentary Himself
Welcome to Los Angeles: A Party for Julio Iglesias 1983 TV Movie Himself
The 54th Annual Academy Awards 1982 TV Special documentary Himself - Presenter: Hersholt Award
Night of 100 Stars 1982 TV Special Himself
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Fred Astaire 1981 TV Movie documentary Himself (uncredited)
The 51st Annual Academy Awards 1979 TV Special documentary Himself - Presenter: Honorary Award to the Museum of Modern Art, Dept. of Film
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Alfred Hitchcock 1979 TV Movie documentary Himself
The 36th Annual Golden Globes Awards 1979 TV Special Himself - Nominee & Presenter
George Burns' 100th Birthday Party 1979 TV Movie Himself
Rockette: A Holiday Tribute to Radio City Music Hall 1978 TV Special Himself - Host
Hollywood's Diamond Jubilee 1978 TV Special Himself - Interviewee
The Mike Douglas Show 1974-1978 TV Series Himself - Guest
The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson 1976-1978 TV Series Himself - Guest
Good Morning America 1978 TV Series Himself - Guest
The 15th Annual Publicists Guild Awards 1978 TV Special Himself - Presenter
A Tribute to Mr. Television Milton Berle 1978 TV Special Himself
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Henry Fonda 1978 TV Special documentary Himself
Today 1977 TV Series Himself - Guest
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Bette Davis 1977 TV Special documentary Himself (uncredited)
The 3rd Annual People's Choice Awards 1977 TV Special Himself - Presenter
NBC: The First Fifty Years - A Closer Look 1976 TV Movie documentary Himself
V.I.P.-Schaukel 1972-1976 TV Series documentary Himself
Dinah! 1976 TV Series Himself - Guest
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to William Wyler 1976 TV Movie documentary Himself
The 46th Annual Academy Awards 1974 TV Special Himself - Co-Presenter: Best Actor in a Leading Role
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to John Ford 1973 TV Movie documentary Himself (uncredited)
Film Night 1972 TV Series Himself
The Pearl Bailey Show 1971 TV Series Himself - Guest
The 43rd Annual Academy Awards 1971 TV Special Himself - Presenter: Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award
The 42nd Annual Academy Awards 1970 TV Special Himself
The American National Theater of Arts Academy Honors Laurence Olivier 1970 TV Movie Himself
Hollywood: The Selznick Years 1969 TV Movie documentary Himself (uncredited)
Jack Benny's New Look 1969 TV Special Himself
The 41st Annual Academy Awards 1969 TV Special Himself
The 22nd Annual Tony Awards 1968 TV Special Himself - Presenter
The 40th Annual Academy Awards 1968 TV Special Himself - Academy President / Hersholt Award Recipient
The Joey Bishop Show 1967 TV Series Himself - Guest
Africa 1967 TV Movie documentary Himself - Narrator (voice)
The 39th Annual Academy Awards 1967 TV Special Himself - Audience Member
The 38th Annual Academy Awards 1966 TV Special Himself - Presenter: Best Foreign Language Film
Salute to Stan Laurel 1965 TV Special documentary Himself
The 37th Annual Academy Awards 1965 TV Special Himself - Presenter: Best Picture
John F. Kennedy: Years of Lightning, Day of Drums 1965 Documentary Narrator (voice)
The 36th Annual Academy Awards 1964 TV Special Himself - Presenter: Best Actress in a Leading Role
The 35th Annual Academy Awards 1963 TV Special Himself - Winner
The 20th Annual Golden Globes Awards 1963 TV Special Himself - Winner: Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama
The 34th Annual Academy Awards 1962 TV Special Himself - Audience Member
Here's Hollywood 1961 TV Series Himself
The 31st Annual Academy Awards 1959 TV Special Himself - Presenter
The Hidden World 1958 Documentary Narrator
The All-Star Christmas Show 1958 TV Movie Himself
The Ed Sullivan Show 1956-1958 TV Series Himself
The 30th Annual Academy Awards 1958 TV Special Himself - Co-Presenter: Art Direction-Set Decoration Awards
Gregory Peck kävi Suomessa 1953 Short Himself
Pictura 1951 Documentary Narrator: Carpaccio episode (voice)
Screen Snapshots: Hollywood Awards 1951 Documentary short Himself
Audrey Hepburn: Ein Star auf der Suche nach sich selbst 2004 TV Movie documentary Himself
AFI's 100 Years... 100 Heroes & Villains 2003 TV Special documentary Atticus Finch
From Russia to Hollywood: The 100-Year Odyssey of Chekhov and Shdanoff 2002 Documentary Himself - Narrator (voice)
Michael Jackson: 30th Anniversary Celebration 2001 TV Special documentary Himself
The Making of 'Cape Fear' 2001/I Video documentary Himself
AFI's 100 Years... 100 Thrills: America's Most Heart-Pounding Movies 2001 TV Special documentary Himself
Hollywood Greats 2001 TV Series documentary Himself
The Making of 'Cape Fear' 2001/II Video documentary short Himself
Memories of Navarone 2000 Video documentary short Himself - Mallory
The Art of Norton Simon 1999 Documentary short Himself - Narrator (voice)
American Prophet: The Story of Joseph Smith 1999 Documentary Narrator
American Masters 1986-1999 TV Series documentary Himself / Himself - Narrator
The 56th Annual Golden Globe Awards 1999 TV Special documentary Himself - Winner
Fearful Symmetry 1998 Video documentary Himself
Tony Bennett Live by Request: An All-Star Tribute 1998 TV Special Himself
The 70th Annual Academy Awards 1998 TV Special Himself - Past Winner (uncredited)
4th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards 1998 TV Special Himself
Thar She Blows: The Making of 'Moby Dick' 1998 TV Movie documentary Himself - Narrator
The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts 1997 TV Special Himself
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Martin Scorsese 1997 TV Special documentary Himself
Howard Stern 1997 TV Series Himself - Guest
Jack Lemmon: America's Everyman 1996 TV Movie documentary
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Clint Eastwood 1996 TV Special documentary Himself
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Steven Spielberg 1996 TV Special documentary Himself (uncredited)
Sinatra: 80 Years My Way 1995 TV Movie documentary Himself
Biography 1995 TV Series documentary Himself
Wild Bill: Hollywood Maverick 1995 Documentary Himself
A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies 1995 TV Movie documentary Himself
The 67th Annual Academy Awards 1995 TV Special Himself - Presenter: 'Quiz Show' Film Clip
La nuit des Césars 1995 TV Series documentary Himself - Winner: César d'honneur
The 52nd Annual Golden Globe Awards 1995 TV Special Himself - Presenter
The Annual American Friends Hebrew University Scopus Awards Honoring Ted Turner 1995 TV Special Himself
L'Hidato Shel Adolf Eichmann 1994 Documentary Himself - Narrator
Baseball 1994 TV Mini-Series documentary Various / Himself
The 51st Annual Golden Globe Awards 1994 TV Special Himself - Presenter
Legend to Legend Night: A Celebrity Cavalcade 1993 TV Special Himself
The 5th Annual Legacy Awards 1993 TV Special Himself
Audrey Hepburn Remembered 1993 TV Movie documentary Himself
The 65th Annual Academy Awards 1993 TV Special Himself - Presenter: Hersholt Award to the late Audrey Hepburn
The 50th Annual Golden Globe Awards 1993 TV Special Himself - Presenter: Cecil B. DeMille Award
Isaac Stern: A Life - A Biography in Music 1993 TV Movie Himself - Narrator
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Sidney Poitier 1992 TV Special Himself
The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts 1992 TV Special Himself
Danny Kaye International Children Award for Unicef 1992 TV Movie Himself
The Film Society of Lincoln Center Annual Gala Tribute to Gregory Peck 1992 TV Movie Himself - Honoree
Crazy About the Movies: Ava Gardner 1992 TV Movie documentary Himself
The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts 1991 TV Special Himself - Honoree
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Kirk Douglas 1991 TV Special documentary Himself (uncredited)
The 63rd Annual Academy Awards 1991 TV Special Himself - Presenter: Honorary Award to Sophia Loren
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to David Lean 1990 TV Special Himself
Island of Whales 1990 Documentary Narrator (voice)
Sinatra 75: The Best Is Yet to Come 1990 TV Special documentary Himself
Reflections on the Silver Screen 1990 TV Series Himself
Gran premio internazionale della TV 1990 TV Series Himself
The 62nd Annual Academy Awards 1990 TV Special Himself - Presenter: Best Actress in a Leading Role
Sammy Davis, Jr. 60th Anniversary Celebration 1990 TV Special Himself
7th Annual American Cinema Awards 1990 TV Special Himself - Honoree
The 47th Annual Golden Globe Awards 1990 TV Special Himself - Presenter: Cecil B. DeMille Award
Mahler's Symphony No. 2 'Resurrection' at Masada 1989 TV Special documentary Himself - Host
The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts 1989 TV Special Himself
Lou Rawls Parade of Stars 1989 TV Series Himself

Archive Footage

Archive Footage

TitleYearStatusCharacter
John G. Avildsen: King of the Underdogs 2017 Documentary
The Fabulous Allan Carr 2017 Documentary Himself
National Endowment for the Arts: United States of Arts 2017 TV Series documentary short Himself
Damien 2016 TV Series Robert Thorn
Personne 2016 Short
Trumbo 2015 Joe Bradley (uncredited)
Inside Edition 2014-2015 TV Series documentary Atticus Finch
Welcome to the Basement 2012-2015 TV Series Atticus Finch / Himself / Joe Bradley
Wogan: The Best Of 2015 TV Series Himself - Guest
Donne nel mito: Sophia racconta la Loren 2014 Documentary short Himself
And the Oscar Goes To... 2014 TV Movie documentary Himself
Piaggio Vespa Commercial 2014 TV Short
Close Up 2012 Documentary Himself
A History of Horror with Mark Gatiss 2010 TV Mini-Series documentary Himself / Robert Thorn
The Naked Archaeologist 2005-2010 TV Series documentary King David
Hollywood contra Franco 2008 Documentary Harry Street / Manuel Artiguez
Strictly Courtroom 2008 TV Movie documentary Atticus Finch Anthony Keane Sam Bowden (uncredited)
Spisok korabley 2008 Documentary
World Film Report 2008 TV Series Himself
Oscar, que empiece el espectáculo 2008 TV Movie documentary Himself
Cámara negra. Teatro Victoria Eugenia 2007 TV Short documentary Himself
Cannes, 60 ans d'histoires 2007 TV Movie documentary Himself
Premio Donostia a Matt Dillon 2006 TV Special Himself
Premio Donostia a Max Von Sydow 2006 TV Special Himself
Infrarouge 2006 TV Series documentary Himself
The Curse of 'The Omen' 2005 TV Movie documentary Himself
Cinema mil 2005 TV Series Himself
Premio Donostia a Willem Dafoe 2005 TV Special Himself
Private Screenings 2005 TV Series Himself
Cineastas contra magnates 2005 Documentary Harry Street
Sendung ohne Namen 2003-2004 TV Series documentary Captain Ahab
Unsere Besten 2004 TV Series Ahab
Imaginary Witness: Hollywood and the Holocaust 2004 Documentary
The 76th Annual Academy Awards 2004 TV Special Himself (Memorial Tribute)
Starring - Taina Elg 2003 TV Movie documentary Himself
La guerra en el cine 2003 Video documentary short General Savage
Remembering 'Roman Holiday' 2002 Video documentary short Himself
Restoring Roman Holiday 2002 Video documentary short
Twentieth Century Fox: The Blockbuster Years 2000 TV Movie documentary Robert Thorn
The Audrey Hepburn Story 2000 TV Movie Himself
Biography 1997-1998 TV Series documentary
American Masters 1998 TV Series documentary
The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg 1998 Documentary Philip Schuyler Green (uncredited)
20th Century-Fox: The First 50 Years 1997 TV Movie documentary Jimmy Ringo
The Universal Story 1995 TV Movie documentary Himself
Passage à l'acte 1993 Short Atticus Finch
Theremin: An Electronic Odyssey 1993 Documentary John Ballantyne (uncredited)
The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson 1992 TV Series Himself
Robert Mitchum: The Reluctant Star 1991 Documentary Sam Bowden (uncredited)
La hora bruja 1985
Ingrid 1984 Documentary John Ballantyne (uncredited)
Margret Dünser, auf der Suche nach den Besonderen 1981 TV Movie documentary Himself
Ken Murray Shooting Stars 1979 Documentary Himself
All This and World War II 1976 Documentary Himself
America at the Movies 1976 Documentary Jimmy Ringo
Hustle 1975 Captain Ahab (uncredited)
The Dick Cavett Show 1971 TV Series Himself
The Extraordinary Seaman 1969 Himself (uncredited)
Pähkähullu Suomi 1967 Himself
Verifica incerta - Disperse Exclamatory Phase 1965 Documentary short
The Love Goddesses 1965 Documentary Himself
Lykke og krone 1962 Documentary Himself (uncredited)
MGM Parade 1956 TV Series
The Ed Sullivan Show 1954 TV Series Himself
The Art Director 1949 Documentary short Himself / Philip Schuyler Green (uncredited)

Won awards

Won awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
2003 Spirit of Angelus Award Angelus Awards Student Film Festival Posthumously.
2003 Career David David di Donatello Awards
1999 Golden Globe Golden Globes, USA Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Moby Dick (1998)
1998 Lifetime Achievement Award German Film Awards
1996 Special Prize for Outstanding Contribution to World Cinema Karlovy Vary International Film Festival
1995 Honorary César César Awards, France
1993 Honorary Golden Berlin Bear Berlin International Film Festival
1992 Gala Tribute Film Society of Lincoln Center
1990 Board of the Governors Award American Society of Cinematographers, USA
1989 Life Achievement Award American Film Institute, USA
1989 Special Award Cannes Film Festival
1986 Donostia Lifetime Achievement Award San Sebastián International Film Festival
1983 Career Achievement Award National Board of Review, USA
1983 Award of Excellence Banff Television Festival
1971 Life Achievement Award Screen Actors Guild Awards
1969 Cecil B. DeMille Award Golden Globes, USA
1969 Golden Apple Golden Apple Awards Male Star of the Year
1968 Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award Academy Awards, USA
1967 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Special

Actor and industry spokesman whose fine work before the cameras and in a host of worthwhile ... More

1963 Oscar Academy Awards, USA Best Actor in a Leading Role To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
1963 Golden Globe Golden Globes, USA Best Motion Picture Actor - Drama To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
1963 David David di Donatello Awards Best Foreign Actor (Migliore Attore Straniero) To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
1960 Star on the Walk of Fame Walk of Fame Motion Picture On 8 February 1960. At 6100 Hollywood Blvd.
1955 Henrietta Award Golden Globes, USA World Film Favorite - Male
1953 Bambi Bambi Awards Best Actor - International David and Bathsheba (1951)
1951 Henrietta Award Golden Globes, USA World Film Favorite - Male
1947 Golden Globe Golden Globes, USA Best Motion Picture Actor The Yearling (1946)
1947 Golden Apple Golden Apple Awards Most Cooperative Actor
1945 Golden Apple Golden Apple Awards Most Cooperative Actor

Nominated awards

Nominated awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
1998 Primetime Emmy Primetime Emmy Awards Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie Moby Dick (1998)
1979 Golden Globe Golden Globes, USA Best Motion Picture Actor - Drama The Boys from Brazil (1978)
1978 Golden Globe Golden Globes, USA Best Motion Picture Actor - Drama MacArthur (1977)
1970 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Male Star 12th place.
1967 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Action Performance Arabesque (1966)
1966 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Male Star 5th place.
1965 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Male Star 14th place.
1964 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Top Male Star 5th place.
1964 Golden Globe Golden Globes, USA Best Motion Picture Actor - Drama Captain Newman, M.D. (1963)
1964 BAFTA Film Award BAFTA Awards Best Foreign Actor To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
1960 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Top Male Star 13th place.
1954 BAFTA Film Award BAFTA Awards Best Foreign Actor Roman Holiday (1953)
1954 Bambi Bambi Awards Best Actor - International Roman Holiday (1953)
1952 Gold Medal Picturegoer Awards Best Actor David and Bathsheba (1951)
1947 Oscar Academy Awards, USA Best Actor in a Leading Role The Yearling (1946)
1946 Oscar Academy Awards, USA Best Actor in a Leading Role The Keys of the Kingdom (1944)

2nd place awards

2nd place awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
1963 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Top Male Dramatic Performance To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

3rd place awards

3rd place awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
1963 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Top Male Star
1962 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Top Male Dramatic Performance The Guns of Navarone (1961)
1959 Golden Laurel Laurel Awards Top Action Performance The Bravados (1958)

TitleSalary
To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) $250,000 + 10% of the gross.
The Purple Plain (1954) $250,000
The Million Pound Note (1954) $250,000
Only the Valiant (1951) $60,000
Days of Glory (1944) $10,000
To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) $250,000 + 10% of the gross.
The Purple Plain (1954) $250,000
The Million Pound Note (1954) $250,000
Only the Valiant (1951) $60,000
Days of Glory (1944) $10,000

#Quote
1 People identify the Stanislavsky method with a group of actors who are physically unlike me - Marlon Brando, James Dean, nowadays Al Pacino, Robert De Niro. That doesn't mean a tall, lanky California actor can't use it. I do and always have.
2 [on The Yearling (1946) in a 1967 interview] It was much too lushly done... The boy cried too much.
3 (In 1984 Peck claimed to have been misquoted in a 1967 interview in which he said Elia Kazan was the wrong director for Gentleman's Agreement (1947).) That's a misunderstanding. I don't think there could have been a better director for the film." What I meant was that he and I didn't have a rapport; emotionally, we were not on the same wave length. I don't think that I did my best work for him. If I worked with him now - as a mature man - I think I would give him everything he would want.
4 When I'm wrongly cast, or in a poor script, I sink with the ship.
5 (On Mackenna's Gold (1969) and Marooned (1969)] They weren't very good, but they were the best that was offered. I did not do them only for the money. I knew they weren;t worth much when I read the scripts. But as soon as I started working on them, damned if I didn't start believing in them. It just goes to prove you can't be an actor and Pauline Kael at the same time.
6 [on preferring his middle name to his first name] There's no nickname for Eldred.
7 I can honestly say that in twenty years of making movies I never had a part that came close to being the real me until Atticus Finch.
8 [on James Cagney] Now, you take a great cinema actor, in my opinion, James Cagney. He went very far. He was very theatrical, very intense, and yet always believable. He riveted the audience's attention. His acting advice was, "Believe what you say -- say what you believe." And that says it, really.
9 I enjoy practicing my craft as well as I possibly can. I enjoy the work for its own sake.
10 One good thing about the bad movies is that people don't remember them. Nobody ever comes up to me and says, 'I hated you in I Walk the Line (1970)!'.
11 [on Frank Sinatra] Undeniably the title holder in the soft-touch department.
12 [2000] Do I think there's a glamorous male actor today? No way.
13 [on what he thought about stars being paid $30 million per movie] I was born too soon!
14 Marilyn Monroe may have been a bit of an extreme example, but she was given the best stories to suit her talents, she was stroked and cared for and treasured and treated like a little princess, treated as a valuable, talented person. What it was that led her to drink and take pills, I don't know. I don't think anyone can put it all together, but it's too easy to say that Hollywood wrung her out and exhausted her, strained her nerves and destroyed her. I think she'd have gone to pieces even sooner without the adulation and the care she received at the hands of her directors and producers and the big studios.
15 [on Robert Mitchum] I had given him the role and had paid him a terrific amount of money. It was obvious he had the better role. I thought he would understand that, but he apparently thought he acted me off the screen. I didn't think highly of him for that.
16 [in 1965] There are times when I could cheerfully walk out on the whole goddamn setup. I don't have to make pictures any more. When I first came out here to work from the New York stage, I was carved up in all directions, a dumb actor tied to a slew of contractual clauses. Today I'm my own man - free, off the hook. This is a collective business, I know. But now it's up to me to decide the stories we use and the kind of picture in which I'm prepared to get involved. I'm no longer the dumb and trusting ham being shuttled from picture to picture at someone else's whim. I'm a company boss who has to make big decisions right or wrong, responsible only to myself in the long run. For years we actors have been fighting for our so-called artistic freedom. We wanted to get rid of the moguls and their accountants. We damned the studio shylocks for their materialism and lack of taste. Now, most of us are on our own. So what happens? This morning I had to call my office and scrap a production on which people had been working for months . . . I decided it would be best to chuck it in rather than risk making a bad picture. All night I've been pacing up and down the house trying to make the right decision. I tell you there are times when I wish Hollywood actors had retained the status of bums and gypsies and left the planning to others. Right now, I'm tempted to say, "The hell with all of it". The picture has changed, my friend. The old omnipotent caliphs are dying fast. Television plus the weight of years has weakened the survivors. It will need energy and a fresh executive approach to redirect the creative drive, re-channel the talent. The monopolies of the studios have been broken. The anti-trust laws have severed their distribution outlets. The shackling of actors to loaded long-term contracts is virtually a thing of the past. In effect, I have complete control over what I do. A year of two back this was considered some kind of victory of art over tyranny. Now I'm not so sure. I'm a free soul, you remember. Before I became an actor, I wanted to be a writer. Freedom of mind and action is important to me. Right now I'd like to take off for Mexico and fish for a while and swim and read books without wondering whether they would make a good picture. Now I'll have to follow another production through from the drawing board to the cutting room. And then go out on the road and sell it with personal appearances. It can be stimulating. A challenge, as they say at Chasens. But there are times when actors like myself find themselves wishing we could resurrect Irving Thalberg and pass the ball to him or people like him. The town's wide open for any operator with the ability to finance, package and sell motion pictures.
17 Every script I'm offered has Cary Grant's paw prints on it.
18 I realize now how very short life is, because I've got to be considered to be in the home stretch. But I won't waste time on recriminations and regrets. And the same goes for my shortcomings and my own failures.
19 [1987] I would give up everything I do and everything I have if I could make a significant difference in getting the nuclear arms race reversed. It is the number-one priority in my life. My work was the main thing in my life for a long time; now I'm beginning to think a little more about what the future will hold and what kind of world my kids will live in.
20 That's why those fellas were so magnificent playing the same part, because they'd played it forty times. That's why John Wayne finally became a good actor in True Grit (1969) - he's got 150 of them behind him. Now he's developed a saltiness and an earthiness and a humor and a subtlety that comes from mining that same vein over and over again.
21 [1956] Of the movies I've done, there isn't much I really like. The Gunfighter (1950), Roman Holiday (1953), Twelve O'Clock High (1949) I feel were my best.
22 I've had my ups and downs. There have been times when I wanted to quit. Times when I hit the bottle. Marital problems. I've touched most of the bases.
23 [on The Boys from Brazil (1978)] I felt, Laurence Olivier felt, friends of mine like Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon felt, that I was good in this part. Some critics seem unwilling to accept actors when they break what they think is the mold or the image.
24 [on Gentleman's Agreement (1947)] We felt we were brave pioneers exploring anti-Semitism in the United States - today, it seems a little dated.
25 [on meeting Pope John Paul II at the White House in 1978] He impressed me more than any other man I've ever met, and I've met a lot. My wife and I happened to be seated on one of the aisles, and the Pope came right down and he saw me and smiled. The smile was genuine, not a politician smile, the practiced smile. He shook hands with me and went on. And then [US President Jimmy Carter] said, "Hello, Gregory, what are you doing here?" and I said, "Well, Mr. President, you invited me". He said, "Just a minute"--and damned if he didn't run after the Pope, grabbing him by the arm and pulled him back. He said, "Your Excellency, this is one of our best-known, most beloved American film actors". And he looked at me, ah! There was a glimmer as if somehow he must have seen me in a movie. His eyes widened and he took me in his arms. And he sort of grabbed me by the elbow and said, "God bless you, Gregory. God bless you in your mission". And he went on.
26 Faith is a force, a powerful force. To me, it's been like an anchor to windward - something that's seen me through troubled times and some personal tragedies and also through the good times and success and the happy times.
27 [1987] Robert Bork wants to be a Supreme Court justice. But the record shows he has a strange idea of what justice is. He defended poll taxes and literacy tests, which kept many Americans from voting. He opposed the civil rights law that ended "whites only" signs at lunch counters. He doesn't believe the Constitution protects your privacy. Please urge your senators to vote against the Bork nomination. Because, if Robert Bork wins a seat on the Supreme Court, it will be for life. His life . . . and yours.
28 [when asked what he thought about the John Holmes porn trial] You know, someone once asked me that and I said the day that Laurence Olivier drops his pants on the screen is the day that I will support adult actors, and then I saw the movie The Betsy (1978).
29 I am a Roman Catholic. Not a fanatic, but I practice enough to keep the franchise. I don't always agree with the Pope . . . there are issues that concern me, like abortion, contraception, the ordination of women . . . and others. I think the Church should open up.
30 You have to dream, you have to have a vision, and you have to set a goal for yourself that might even scare you a little because sometimes that seems far beyond your reach. Then I think you have to develop a kind of resistance to rejection, and to the disappointments that are sure to come your way.
31 I don't lecture and I don't grind any axes. I just want to entertain.
32 I'm not a do-gooder. It embarrassed me to be classified as a humanitarian. I simply take part in activities that I believe in.
33 [on gay rights] It just seems silly to me that something so right and simple has to be fought for at all.
34 Gregory Peck is the hottest thing in town. Some say he is a second Gary Cooper. Actually, he is the first Gregory Peck.
35 I just do things I really enjoy. I enjoy acting. When I'm driving to the studio, I sing in the car. I love my work and my wife and my kids and my friends. And I think, "You're a lucky man, Gregory Peck, a damn lucky man."
36 They say the bad guys are more interesting to play but there is more to it than that - playing the good guys is more challenging because it's harder to make them interesting.
37 [on his 1962 Oscar-winning role in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)] I put everything I had into it - all my feelings and everything I'd learned in 46 years of living, about family life and fathers and children. And my feelings about racial justice and inequality and opportunity.
38 [when he discovered that his second wife, French journalist Veronique Peck, had passed up an opportunity to interview Albert Schweitzer at a lunch hosted by Jean-Paul Sartre in order to go out on a date with Peck] You made the right choice, kiddo!
39 People identify the Stanislavsky method with a group of actors who are physically unlike me - Marlon Brando, James Dean, nowadays Al Pacino, Robert De Niro. That doesn't mean a tall, lanky California actor can't use it. I do and always have.
40 [on The Yearling (1946) in a 1967 interview] It was much too lushly done... The boy cried too much.
41 (In 1984 Peck claimed to have been misquoted in a 1967 interview in which he said Elia Kazan was the wrong director for Gentleman's Agreement (1947).) That's a misunderstanding. I don't think there could have been a better director for the film." What I meant was that he and I didn't have a rapport; emotionally, we were not on the same wave length. I don't think that I did my best work for him. If I worked with him now - as a mature man - I think I would give him everything he would want.
42 When I'm wrongly cast, or in a poor script, I sink with the ship.
43 (On Mackenna's Gold (1969) and Marooned (1969)] They weren't very good, but they were the best that was offered. I did not do them only for the money. I knew they weren;t worth much when I read the scripts. But as soon as I started working on them, damned if I didn't start believing in them. It just goes to prove you can't be an actor and Pauline Kael at the same time.
44 [on preferring his middle name to his first name] There's no nickname for Eldred.
45 I can honestly say that in twenty years of making movies I never had a part that came close to being the real me until Atticus Finch.
46 [on James Cagney] Now, you take a great cinema actor, in my opinion, James Cagney. He went very far. He was very theatrical, very intense, and yet always believable. He riveted the audience's attention. His acting advice was, "Believe what you say -- say what you believe." And that says it, really.
47 I enjoy practicing my craft as well as I possibly can. I enjoy the work for its own sake.
48 One good thing about the bad movies is that people don't remember them. Nobody ever comes up to me and says, 'I hated you in I Walk the Line (1970)!'.
49 [on Frank Sinatra] Undeniably the title holder in the soft-touch department.
50 [2000] Do I think there's a glamorous male actor today? No way.
51 [on what he thought about stars being paid $30 million per movie] I was born too soon!
52 Marilyn Monroe may have been a bit of an extreme example, but she was given the best stories to suit her talents, she was stroked and cared for and treasured and treated like a little princess, treated as a valuable, talented person. What it was that led her to drink and take pills, I don't know. I don't think anyone can put it all together, but it's too easy to say that Hollywood wrung her out and exhausted her, strained her nerves and destroyed her. I think she'd have gone to pieces even sooner without the adulation and the care she received at the hands of her directors and producers and the big studios.
53 [on Robert Mitchum] I had given him the role and had paid him a terrific amount of money. It was obvious he had the better role. I thought he would understand that, but he apparently thought he acted me off the screen. I didn't think highly of him for that.
54 [in 1965] There are times when I could cheerfully walk out on the whole goddamn setup. I don't have to make pictures any more. When I first came out here to work from the New York stage, I was carved up in all directions, a dumb actor tied to a slew of contractual clauses. Today I'm my own man - free, off the hook. This is a collective business, I know. But now it's up to me to decide the stories we use and the kind of picture in which I'm prepared to get involved. I'm no longer the dumb and trusting ham being shuttled from picture to picture at someone else's whim. I'm a company boss who has to make big decisions right or wrong, responsible only to myself in the long run. For years we actors have been fighting for our so-called artistic freedom. We wanted to get rid of the moguls and their accountants. We damned the studio shylocks for their materialism and lack of taste. Now, most of us are on our own. So what happens? This morning I had to call my office and scrap a production on which people had been working for months . . . I decided it would be best to chuck it in rather than risk making a bad picture. All night I've been pacing up and down the house trying to make the right decision. I tell you there are times when I wish Hollywood actors had retained the status of bums and gypsies and left the planning to others. Right now, I'm tempted to say, "The hell with all of it". The picture has changed, my friend. The old omnipotent caliphs are dying fast. Television plus the weight of years has weakened the survivors. It will need energy and a fresh executive approach to redirect the creative drive, re-channel the talent. The monopolies of the studios have been broken. The anti-trust laws have severed their distribution outlets. The shackling of actors to loaded long-term contracts is virtually a thing of the past. In effect, I have complete control over what I do. A year of two back this was considered some kind of victory of art over tyranny. Now I'm not so sure. I'm a free soul, you remember. Before I became an actor, I wanted to be a writer. Freedom of mind and action is important to me. Right now I'd like to take off for Mexico and fish for a while and swim and read books without wondering whether they would make a good picture. Now I'll have to follow another production through from the drawing board to the cutting room. And then go out on the road and sell it with personal appearances. It can be stimulating. A challenge, as they say at Chasens. But there are times when actors like myself find themselves wishing we could resurrect Irving Thalberg and pass the ball to him or people like him. The town's wide open for any operator with the ability to finance, package and sell motion pictures.
55 Every script I'm offered has Cary Grant's paw prints on it.
56 I realize now how very short life is, because I've got to be considered to be in the home stretch. But I won't waste time on recriminations and regrets. And the same goes for my shortcomings and my own failures.
57 [1987] I would give up everything I do and everything I have if I could make a significant difference in getting the nuclear arms race reversed. It is the number-one priority in my life. My work was the main thing in my life for a long time; now I'm beginning to think a little more about what the future will hold and what kind of world my kids will live in.
58 That's why those fellas were so magnificent playing the same part, because they'd played it forty times. That's why John Wayne finally became a good actor in True Grit (1969) - he's got 150 of them behind him. Now he's developed a saltiness and an earthiness and a humor and a subtlety that comes from mining that same vein over and over again.
59 [1956] Of the movies I've done, there isn't much I really like. The Gunfighter (1950), Roman Holiday (1953), Twelve O'Clock High (1949) I feel were my best.
60 I've had my ups and downs. There have been times when I wanted to quit. Times when I hit the bottle. Marital problems. I've touched most of the bases.
61 [on The Boys from Brazil (1978)] I felt, Laurence Olivier felt, friends of mine like Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon felt, that I was good in this part. Some critics seem unwilling to accept actors when they break what they think is the mold or the image.
62 [on Gentleman's Agreement (1947)] We felt we were brave pioneers exploring anti-Semitism in the United States - today, it seems a little dated.
63 [on meeting Pope John Paul II at the White House in 1978] He impressed me more than any other man I've ever met, and I've met a lot. My wife and I happened to be seated on one of the aisles, and the Pope came right down and he saw me and smiled. The smile was genuine, not a politician smile, the practiced smile. He shook hands with me and went on. And then [US President Jimmy Carter] said, "Hello, Gregory, what are you doing here?" and I said, "Well, Mr. President, you invited me". He said, "Just a minute"--and damned if he didn't run after the Pope, grabbing him by the arm and pulled him back. He said, "Your Excellency, this is one of our best-known, most beloved American film actors". And he looked at me, ah! There was a glimmer as if somehow he must have seen me in a movie. His eyes widened and he took me in his arms. And he sort of grabbed me by the elbow and said, "God bless you, Gregory. God bless you in your mission". And he went on.
64 Faith is a force, a powerful force. To me, it's been like an anchor to windward - something that's seen me through troubled times and some personal tragedies and also through the good times and success and the happy times.
65 [1987] Robert Bork wants to be a Supreme Court justice. But the record shows he has a strange idea of what justice is. He defended poll taxes and literacy tests, which kept many Americans from voting. He opposed the civil rights law that ended "whites only" signs at lunch counters. He doesn't believe the Constitution protects your privacy. Please urge your senators to vote against the Bork nomination. Because, if Robert Bork wins a seat on the Supreme Court, it will be for life. His life . . . and yours.
66 [when asked what he thought about the John Holmes porn trial] You know, someone once asked me that and I said the day that Laurence Olivier drops his pants on the screen is the day that I will support adult actors, and then I saw the movie The Betsy (1978).
67 I am a Roman Catholic. Not a fanatic, but I practice enough to keep the franchise. I don't always agree with the Pope . . . there are issues that concern me, like abortion, contraception, the ordination of women . . . and others. I think the Church should open up.
68 You have to dream, you have to have a vision, and you have to set a goal for yourself that might even scare you a little because sometimes that seems far beyond your reach. Then I think you have to develop a kind of resistance to rejection, and to the disappointments that are sure to come your way.
69 I don't lecture and I don't grind any axes. I just want to entertain.
70 I'm not a do-gooder. It embarrassed me to be classified as a humanitarian. I simply take part in activities that I believe in.
71 [on gay rights] It just seems silly to me that something so right and simple has to be fought for at all.
72 Gregory Peck is the hottest thing in town. Some say he is a second Gary Cooper. Actually, he is the first Gregory Peck.
73 I just do things I really enjoy. I enjoy acting. When I'm driving to the studio, I sing in the car. I love my work and my wife and my kids and my friends. And I think, "You're a lucky man, Gregory Peck, a damn lucky man."
74 They say the bad guys are more interesting to play but there is more to it than that - playing the good guys is more challenging because it's harder to make them interesting.
75 [on his 1962 Oscar-winning role in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)] I put everything I had into it - all my feelings and everything I'd learned in 46 years of living, about family life and fathers and children. And my feelings about racial justice and inequality and opportunity.
76 [when he discovered that his second wife, French journalist Veronique Peck, had passed up an opportunity to interview Albert Schweitzer at a lunch hosted by Jean-Paul Sartre in order to go out on a date with Peck] You made the right choice, kiddo!

#Trademark
1 Often plays leaders or authority figures
2 Imposing stature
3 Films often reflected his liberal political views
4 Distinctive low-pitched voice
5 Almost always played courageous, nobly heroic good guys who saw injustice and fought it.
6 Often plays leaders or authority figures
7 Imposing stature
8 Films often reflected his liberal political views
9 Distinctive low-pitched voice
10 Almost always played courageous, nobly heroic good guys who saw injustice and fought it.

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