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Carole Lombard

Biography

Starred with Clark Gable in 1932’s Zero Man of Her Personal and performed the lead role in the 1942 film TO BECOME or Never to Become. She produced her film debut at age group twelve in AN IDEAL Crime. Her huge Hollywood career finished at age group 33 when she passed away in an aircraft crash. She wedded William Powell in 1931, as well as the few divorced in 1933. She was after that wedded to Clark Gable from 1939 to 1942. She starred reverse Wayne Stewart in the 1939 humor Designed for Each Other.

Quick Facts


Full Name Carole Lombard
Date Of Birth October 6, 1908
Place Of Birth Fort Wayne, IN
Height 1.68 m
Profession Movie Actress
Education Fairfax High School
Nationality American
Spouse Clark Gable, William Powell
Parents Frederick C. Peters, Elizabeth Knight
Siblings Fred C. Peters Jr, Stuart Peters
Awards Presidential Medal of Freedom
Nominations Academy Award for Best Actress
Movies My Man Godfrey, Nothing Sacred, No Man of Her Own, Made for Each Other, Twentieth Century, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, To Be or Not to Be, Swing High, Swing Low, Hands Across the Table, In Name Only, Man of the World, Vigil in the Night, True Confession, The Princess Comes Across, Love Before Breakfast, We're Not Dressing, Big News, They Knew What They Wanted, The Racketeer, The Gay Bride, Now and Forever, Brief Moment, Up Pops the Devil, A Perfect Crime, High Voltage, Fools for Scandal, No More Orchids, Lady by Choice, No One Man, Ladies' Man, Safety in Numbers, Sinners in the Sun, The Swim Princess, The Eagle and the Hawk, I Take This Woman, Fast and Loose, Show Folks, White Woman, It Pays to Advertise, Hearts and Spurs, The Campus Vamp, From Hell to Heaven, The Arizona Kid, Bolero, Ned McCobb's Daughter, Virtue, Supernatural, Me, Gangster, The Johnstown Flood, Rumba, The Scarlett O'Hara War
Star Sign Libra

  • Facts
  • Filmography
  • Awards
  • Salaries
  • Quotes
  • Trademarks
  • Pictures

#Fact
1Both of her husbands, William Powell and Clark Gable, starred in Manhattan Melodrama (1934).
2According to Penny Stallings' "Flesh and Fantasy", Lombard drew a shadow along her natural cleavage line and lightened the top of her breasts to make them look larger.
3She preferred the company of the grips, electricians and other off-camera workers to that of other actors. In her conversations with them, she could (and did) swear like a trooper.
4She was flying on Transcontinental and Western Airlines (TWA) Flight 3 en route from McCarran Field, Las Vegas, Nevada, to Lockheed Air Terminal, Burbank, California, when it crashed approx. 33.1 miles (53 kilometers) southwest of Las Vegas at 19:20 (7:20 pm) on January 16, 1942. The aircraft flew into an almost vertical rock cliff, near the top of Potosi Mountain in the Spring Mountain Range. The three crew members and 19 passengers were all killed. The official accident report states that the crash was caused by "the failure of the captain after departure from Las Vegas to follow the proper course by making use of the navigational facilities available to him".
5She was credited with the invention of the slang terms "she's so blonde" and "dumb blonde", due in part to the fact that she played several blonde scatterbrains during the 1930s and mid-1940s.
6She once raised over $2 million in war bonds in one day.
7In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Carole Lombard #23 on their list of 50 Greatest American Female Screen Legends.
8Lombard shared her first screen kiss with Buck Jones in Durand of the Bad Lands (1925).
9She did a screen test for Charles Chaplin's comedy-drama film The Gold Rush (1925).
10During the tour of Hearst's Castle in San Simeon, California, visitors are shown a second-floor bedroom where, the story goes, Lombard and Clark Gable spent their wedding night. It's a room with a beautiful view, and a huge water storage tank rests hidden above it. The water was gravity-fed from an adjoining hill to provide water to the estate.
11One of her classmates at drama school was Sally Eilers.
12Profiled in the book "Funny Ladies: 100 Years of Great Comediennes" by Stephen M. Silverman (1999).
13Turned down the role of Ellie Andrews in It Happened One Night (1934). Claudette Colbert was then given the role and won a Best Actress Oscar for her performance.
14She and Clark Gable first met in late 1924 while working as extras on the set of Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1925). They would make three films together as extras--Ben-Hur, The Johnstown Flood (1926) and The Plastic Age (1925)--and star together in No Man of Her Own (1932), but not become romantically attached until 1936.
15She was good friends with Gloria Swanson.
16After her death, the Van Nuys News ran an unusual front page tribute: "Down deep in their hearts, those who had chatted with her over the back fence or across a garden row knew that Carole Lombard wanted more than anything else to be a model housewife and a good neighbor. And she was just that. She was a loveable person, just as much at home in blue denims and ginghams as she was in furs and jewels.".
17According to Garson Kanin, she never had a dressing room when shooting a movie. Instead, she preferred to socialize with the cast and crew members during her breaks.
18Twice turned down opportunities to play a newspaperwoman, in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) and His Girl Friday (1940). The roles brought their respective actresses (Jean Arthur and Rosalind Russell) considerable attention.
19She was often doubled by her old school friend, Dixie Pantages. Dixie had an even more unusual background than Carole herself did: she was born in extreme poverty, but when her mother died, she was adopted by the wealthy Pantages family so that their own daughter, a childhood playmate of Dixie's, could have a sister. When that happened, her name changed legally from Dixie Nelson to Dixie Pantages as a result of the adoption becoming legal.
20Attended and graduated from Fairfax High School in Los Angeles, California in 1927. Was elected "May Queen" in 1924. Quit soon thereafter to pursue acting full time.
21Just before her relationship with Clark Gable began in earnest, Carole read and loved the book "Gone With the Wind". Excited, she sent a copy of the book to Gable, with a note attached reading "Let's do it!". Gable wrongly assumed she was making a sexual advance to him, and called Carole to organize a date. When he found out Carole wanted to make a film of the book with him as Rhett Butler and herself as Scarlett, he refused, and kept the copy of the book she had given him thereafter in his toilet.
22She had a little dachshund named Commissioner that ignored Clark Gable completely. After her death in 1942, the dog would not leave his side.
23She was of English and German heritage.
24Carol Lynley (born as Carole Jones a month after the actress' death) was named after Lombard.
25Part of her honeymoon with Clark Gable was at the Willows Inn in Palm Springs, California. The Inn continues to operate and anyone can stay in the same room, called "The Library Suite". The room remains largely unaltered since the Gables stayed there more than 60 years ago.
26Attended Virgil Junior High School on Virgil Avenue in Los Angeles, California in the early 1920s. The school currently exists as Virgil Middle School on Vermont Avenue, one block from the original school.
27Her performance as Maria Tura in To Be or Not to Be (1942) is ranked #38 on Premiere magazine's 100 Greatest Performances of All Time (2006).
28Was a second-generation Bahá'í who formally declared her membership to the Bahá'í Faith in 1938.
29The plane crash that killed her took place less than a month before the Oscars. Despite her mother's premonition of the disaster, she refused to take a train to Los Angeles. She was reputedly in a rush after getting wind of an alleged affair between her husband Clark Gable and Lana Turner who were filming Somewhere I'll Find You (1942) at the time. The decision to take the plane was decided literally by the flip of a coin, with Carole winning the toss.
30Considered by many to be the prototype for the icy blondes in Alfred Hitchcock's films.
31She was offered the lead role in a proposed melodrama, "Smiler with a Knife", to be directed by a newcomer at RKO Radio Pictures named Orson Welles. She turned down the role, opting to return to screwball comedy in Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941). Welles refused to make Smiler without her; instead, he began work on Citizen Kane (1941).
32Lucille Ball said she finally decided to go ahead with I Love Lucy (1951) when Carole, who had been a close friend, came to her in a dream and recommended she take a chance on the risky idea of entering television.
33The Jack Benny radio show that followed her death was cancelled because Benny, a good friend and admirer, was grief-stricken. The time was filled with music instead.
34She was posthumously awarded a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6930 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California on February 8, 1960.
35Her film To Be or Not to Be (1942) was in post-production when she died in a plane crash, and the producers decided to leave out a part that had her character ironically saying, "What can happen in a plane?".
36She was posthumously awarded the Medal of Freedom by President Franklin D. Roosevelt as the first woman killed in the line of duty in World War II. FDR greatly admired her work for the war effort, and ironically she was returning from an engagement selling War Bonds when her plane crashed. In 1983, Orson Welles claimed he had been told that Lombard's plane had actually been shot down by American Nazi sympathizers.
37A natural tomboy with athletic prowess and spirit far exceeding her size (she was a petite child who stood 5' 2", with shoes), the future screen star frequently joined her brothers in roughhousing.
38Cousin-in-law of Mary Astor, Athole Shearer, Bessie Love, Dee Hartford and Eden Hartford.
39Both of her marriages were childless.
40Second cousin of director Howard Hawks, Kenneth Hawks and William B. Hawks.
41Following her untimely death, she was interred at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California, in the Great Mausoleum, Sanctuary of Trust.
42Lombard was listed in the credits of Safety in Numbers (1930), her first Paramount release, as Carole (instead of Carol as in her previous billings). They decided that this would now be the official spelling and she went along with it. She legally changed her name to Carole Lombard in 1936. Only in her first film, A Perfect Crime (1921) did she use her real name, Jane Peters.
43Linked romantically to crooner Russ Columbo until his accidental death late in 1934.
44A 1926 automobile accident badly cut her face. Advanced plastic surgery and adroit use of make-up covered the scars. However, at the time the belief was that use of anesthetic during the operation would leave worse scars, so she endured the reconstructive surgery without an anesthetic.
45During World War II, after her death, a Liberty ship was named after her.


Actress

Actress

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Swing High, Swing Low1937Maggie King
My Man Godfrey1936Irene Bullock
The Princess Comes Across1936Princess Olga
Love Before Breakfast1936Kay Colby
Hands Across the Table1935Regi Allen
Rumba1935Diana Harrison
The Gay Bride1934Mary Magiz
Lady by Choice1934Alabam Lee
Now and Forever1934Toni Carstairs Day
Twentieth Century1934Lily Garland aka Mildred Plotka
We're Not Dressing1934Doris Worthington
Bolero1934Helen Hathaway
White Woman1933Judith Denning
Brief Moment1933Abby Fane
The Eagle and the Hawk1933The Beautiful Lady
Supernatural1933Roma Courtney
From Hell to Heaven1933Colly Tanner
No Man of Her Own1932Connie Randall
No More Orchids1932Annie Holt
Virtue1932Mae
Sinners in the Sun1932Doris Blake
No One Man1932Penelope 'Nep' Newbold
I Take This Woman1931Kay Dowling
Up Pops the Devil1931Anne Merrick
Ladies' Man1931Rachel Fendley
Man of the World1931Mary Kendall
It Pays to Advertise1931Mary Grayson
Fast and Loose1930Alice O'Neil
Safety in Numbers1930Pauline
The Arizona Kid1930Virginia Hoyt
The Racketeer1929Rhoda Philbrooke (as Carol Lombard)
Big News1929Margaret Banks (as Carol Lombard)
High Voltage1929Billie Davis (The Girl) (as Carol Lombard)
Don't Get Jealous1929ShortGirl at Shoeshine Stand (uncredited)
Matchmaking Mamma1929ShortPhyllis (as Carol Lombard)
Ned McCobb's Daughter1928Jennie (as Carol Lombard)
The Campus Vamp1928ShortCarole (as Carol Lombard)
Hubby's Weekend Trip1928ShortMinor Role (uncredited)
Show Folks1928Cleo (as Carol Lombard)
Me, Gangster1928Blonde Rosie (as Carol Lombard)
Motorboat Mamas1928ShortAutomobile Passenger (uncredited)
Power1928Another Dame (as Carol Lombard)
The Campus Carmen1928ShortCarole (as Carol Lombard)
Smith's Restaurant1928ShortMinor Role (uncredited)
His Unlucky Night1928ShortPeggy - Telephone Operator (as Carol Lombard)
The Girl from Nowhere1928ShortMiss Boyle - Dress Shop Owner (as Carol Lombard)
The Divine Sinner1928Millie Claudert (as Carol Lombard)
The Bicycle Flirt1928ShortMabel - the Wife's Sister (as Carol Lombard)
The Swim Princess1928ShortTrudy - the Swim Star (as Carol Lombard)
The Best Man1928ShortWedding Guest (uncredited)
Smith's Army Life1928ShortClarence's Wife
The Beach Club1928ShortRope Jumping Bathing Girl (uncredited)
Run, Girl, Run1928ShortNorma Nurmi (as Carol Lombard)
The Girl from Everywhere1927ShortVera Veranda - Miss Anybody (as Carol Lombard)
My Best Girl1927Flirty Blonde Salesgirl (uncredited)
Gold Digger of Weepah1927ShortFortune Teller (uncredited)
Smith's Pony1927ShortLillian Saunders (as Carol Lombard)
The Fighting Eagle1927unconfirmed
The Johnstown Flood1926One of Gloria's Four Friends / Bridesmaid (working as Carol Lombard) (uncredited)
The Road to Glory1926Bit Part (as Carol Lombard)
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ1925Slave Girl (uncredited)
The Plastic Age1925Co-ed (uncredited)
Durand of the Bad Lands1925Ellen Boyd (as Carol Lombard)
Pretty Ladies1925Showgirl (uncredited)
Hearts and Spurs1925Sybil Estabrook (as Carol Lombard)
Gold and the Girl1925as Carol Lombard
Marriage in Transit1925Celia Hathaway (as Carol Lombard)
Dick Turpin1925Crowd Extra (uncredited)
Gold Heels1924Bit (uncredited)
A Perfect Crime1921Griggs' Sister (as Jane Peters)
To Be or Not to Be1942Maria Tura
Mr. & Mrs. Smith1941Ann Smith
They Knew What They Wanted1940Amy Peters
Vigil in the Night1940Anne Lee
In Name Only1939Julie Eden
Made for Each Other1939Jane Mason
Fools for Scandal1938Kay Winters
True Confession1937Helen Bartlett
Nothing Sacred1937Hazel Flagg

Soundtrack

Soundtrack

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Made for Each Other1939performer: "Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean" 1843 - uncredited
Fools for Scandal1938"Fools for Scandal" 1938, uncredited
Nothing Sacred1937performer: "Three O'clock in the Morning" 1922 - uncredited
Swing High, Swing Low1937performer: "I Hear a Call to Arms" 1937, "Then It Isn't Love" 1937 - uncredited
Lady by Choice1934performer: "M-O-T-H-E-R, a Word That Means the World to Me" 1915 - uncredited
White Woman1933performer: "Yes, My Dear", "He's a Cute Brute"
Brief Moment1933performer: "Say What You Mean, and Mean What You're Saying to Me"
Safety in Numbers1930performer: "You Appeal to Me" - uncredited

Self

Self

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Screen Snapshots Series 18, No. 91939Documentary shortHerself, Horse Show Attendee
Hollywood Goes to Town1938Short documentaryHerself
Breakdowns of 19381938Documentary shortKay Winters (Fools for Scandal outtakes) (uncredited)
Screen Snapshots Series 16, No. 31936Documentary shortHerself - Observer
The Fashion Side of Hollywood1935Documentary shortHerself
Hollywood on Parade No. 111933ShortHerself
Hollywood on Parade No. A-131933ShortHerself
The Voice of Hollywood No. 121930ShortHerself (uncredited)

Archive Footage

Archive Footage

TitleYearStatusCharacter
The Mack Sennett Collection: Volume One2014Video
Life's A Dive2014Documentary short
Mysteries at the Museum2013TV Series documentaryHerself
Gable and Crawford2008Video documentary shortHerself
William Powell: A True Gentleman2005Video short
Imaginary Witness: Hollywood and the Holocaust2004Documentary
Clark Gable and Carole Lombard2003TV Movie documentaryHerself
Seabiscuit: Racing Through History2003Video documentary shortHerself (uncredited)
Biography2001-2003TV Series documentaryHerself / Herself - Subject
72nd Annual Academy Awards Pre-Show2000TV SpecialHerself (uncredited)
That's Entertainment! III1994DocumentaryPerformer in Clip from 'The Gay Bride' (uncredited)
The Our Gang Story1994Video documentaryHerself
The Making of a Legend: Gone with the Wind1988TV Movie documentaryHerself - Attending Premiere with Clark Gable
Entertaining the Troops1988DocumentaryHerself
Power Profiles: Legendary Ladies - Bette Davis and Carole Lombard1987VideoHerself
Maxie1985Young Maxie (in silent film) (uncredited)
Going Hollywood: The '30s1984Documentary
Zelig1983Herself (uncredited)
Showbiz Goes to War1982TV Movie
Bob Hope's Overseas Christmas Tours: Around the World with the Troops - 1941-19721980TV Movie documentaryHerself
Bob Hope's World of Comedy1976TV MovieHerself
Hooray for Hollywood1975DocumentaryHerself
Brother Can You Spare a Dime1975DocumentaryHerself
Hollywood: The Selznick Years1969TV Movie documentaryActress 'Nothing Sacred' (uncredited)
Dear Mr. Gable1968Documentary
Film Preview1966TV SeriesIrene Bullock
Hollywood My Home Town1965DocumentaryHerself
Inside Daisy Clover1965Herself (uncredited)
The Love Goddesses1965DocumentaryHerself
The Big Parade of Comedy1964DocumentaryMary Magiz in 'The Gay Bride'
Hollywood and the Stars1964TV SeriesHerself
Hollywood Without Make-Up1963DocumentaryHerself
Hollywood: The Golden Years1961TV Movie documentaryActress 'Run, Girl, Run' (uncredited)
The Golden Age of Comedy1957Documentary
The Steve Allen Plymouth Show1957TV SeriesHerself
Screen Snapshots: Ramblin' Round Hollywood1955Documentary shortHerself
Screen Snapshots: Hollywood Stars to Remember1954ShortHerself
Yesterday and Today1953
Show-Business at War1943Documentary shortHerself
Picture People No. 10: Hollywood at Home1942Documentary shortHerself
Hollywood on Parade No. A-121933ShortHerself (uncredited)

Won awards

Won awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
1960Star on the Walk of FameWalk of FameMotion PictureOn 8 February 1960. At 6930 Hollywood Blvd.

Nominated awards

Nominated awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
1937OscarAcademy Awards, USABest Actress in a Leading RoleMy Man Godfrey (1936)

TitleSalary
They Knew What They Wanted (1940)$150,000
Vigil in the Night (1940)$150,000 + % of gross
In Name Only (1939)$150,000 + % of gross
Made for Each Other (1939)$150,000
Nothing Sacred (1937)$18,750 /week
Swing High, Swing Low (1937)$150,000
Rumba (1935)$3,000 /week
Twentieth Century (1934)$5,000
No Man of Her Own (1932)$1,000 /week
Fast and Loose (1930)$350 /week
Matchmaking Mamma (1929)$400 /week
The Swim Princess (1928)$400 /week
Hearts and Spurs (1925)$25 /week
Marriage in Transit (1925)$75 /week

#Quote
1[her last words to the public before leaving on a fund-raising flight for the war effort, January 15, 1942] Before I say goodbye to you all, come on - join me in a big cheer - "V for Victory!".
2[speaking at an Indianapolis war-bond rally, January 15, 1942] At first thought, we might say, "Our job is to win a war"... but I am sure it would be closer to the hearts of all of us to say, "We are fighting a war to assure peace... our kind of peace.".
3An at-home costume or hostess gown is absolutely essential for the woman who entertains, and for two reasons. First, this type of costume is extremely flattering, and that does wonders for any woman's poise, and secondly, it eliminates the possibility of appearing overdressed in case a guest shows up in a simple daytime outfit. If a woman has a limited wardrobe, it would be wise to sacrifice a second dinner or evening frock for one hostess gown. She'll soon rate it the most valuable asset in her clothes collection.
4I know it's a sweet deal, but the story stinks... I don't care if it is the studio's money, I don't like it.
5I enjoy this country. I like the parks and the highways and the good schools and everything that this government does. After all, every cent anybody pays in taxes is spent to benefit him. I don't need $465,000 a year for myself, so why not give what I don't need to the government for improvements of the country. There's no better place to spend it.
6I think marriage is dangerous. The idea of two people trying to possess each other is wrong. I don't think the flare of love lasts. Your mind rather than your emotions must answer for the success of matrimony. It must be friendship -- a calm companionship which can last through the years.
7[on the concept of God] I don't seem to get solemn about it, and some people might not understand. That's why I never talk about it. I think it's all here--in the mountains and the desert. I don't think God is a softie, either. In the end, it's better if people are forced back into--well--into being right, before they're too far gone. I think your temple is your everyday living.
8[William Powell] is the only intelligent actor I've ever met.
9[on why she would not work with Orson Welles] I can't win working with Welles. If the picture's a huge hit, he'll get the credit and, if it's a flop, I'll be blamed.
10I've lived by a man's code designed to fit a man's world, yet at the same time, I never forget that a woman's first job is to choose the right shade of lipstick.

#Trademark
1Sparkling blue eyes
2Platinum blonde hair

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